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It is easy to meet with jazz pianists but where do people meet to play keyboad, eg piano or organ, in the genres of "classical" and "church" music?

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    I guess that for church music, they meet in a church. If you want a large traditional organ then your choices are limited. Churches and a few concert halls but you probably have more chance of getting to play an orgam in a church. – badjohn Sep 1 '18 at 10:59
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    What makes you think pianists/organists meet up? Most of us just sit in our rooms playing our pianos on our own :( – Bob says reinstate Monica Sep 1 '18 at 14:50
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    But seriously, the only place to play "church" music (or any music) on an organ is in church (OK, there are a few concert halls and maybe a cinema or two left with one too). I have more than one friend who is a church organist not because they're religious (they aren't) but because that's the only way to play an organ. – Bob says reinstate Monica Sep 1 '18 at 14:53
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    I'm a bit confused -- are you talking about meeting up to play together or meeting up to learn how to play that genre? From your comment, it seems like you mean the latter. The best way to learn the language of piano or organ is to find an instructor. Even jazz musicians don't typically meet up to learn how to play, but to jam out. There are plenty of teachers out there that teach how to play classical music, and others teaching how to play church music. – Kevin H Sep 1 '18 at 17:19
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    @Hank since classical performers can get by without writing any music of their own (not that they should) there is very little emphasis on what I think you mean by “learning the language”. Most of the learning process takes place in private lessons with your teacher, behind closed doors. – 11684 Sep 1 '18 at 19:46
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Organ players are, by necessity, usually associated with a church. (Because that's where organs generally ARE!) 'Classical' pianists may meet through a shared teacher. But (rather sadly) 'classical' piano playing is often a solitary pursuit. All other instruments get to play in a band or orchestra, pianists too often play alone.

Put out the word that you'd like to start a piano club. Someone must have a reasonably good piano and enough room to host a meeting. Or you could ask to borrow a room at a school, church etc.

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One place is the Associated Chamber Music Players, https://www.acmp.net/

This organization has chapters all over the world, and regular get-togethers in many cities and towns.

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If you just want to meet people and network, try joining the local college or church choir. Or there may be other community or college groups that require pianists, such as local drama productions, student orchestras, dance/ballet troupes, etc. I think a lot of these groups welcome volunteers who can help with piano.

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After learning alone, performing in front of people has a way of generating anxiety. It was surprisingly hard for me, and it was messing up my piano exam performances. So, I joined a local Meetup Group (organised on Meetup.com) where people perform to each other in a friendly and supportive environment. Performances are not criticised or critiqued no matter how good. We started by using a piano at a local music studio which had a room large enough for about 10 people. The studio manager/owner charged everyone that attended just £3 for 2 hours on a Saturday afternoon. We took it in turns to play prepared pieces. Over time we have found other venues to hire a couple of hours on some very fine pianos albeit at a higher price. There are other groups on Meetup.com that do something similar, some of them are sponsored or hosted.

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