Interested to know how modern performers harmonize Hindustani classical music. Like, I heard a beautiful piano performance in Raga Shuddh Sarang. Was wondering what would be the left hand playing - what kind of chords, or arpeggios, notes etc? Is there any contrapuntal concept?

Any practitioner's perspective with some easy examples, in ragas like Bhairavi, Yaman, etc?

  • Are you more interested in style or in the actual harmony/theory used to generate the accompaniment? – Carl Witthoft Sep 6 at 12:25
  • Interested in the fundamentals. Didn't understand the meaning of "style". – Subir Nag Sep 6 at 12:32

The following can be said to be the typical left hand patterns:

To generate the chikari effect in alap, jod and jhala, and even in the later sections. Watch here how the left hand is harmonizing the reference notes

Use in melodic sections by completing the melody with both hands. Even if one distant note comes from the left hand, it can bring some relief to the right hand, especially if the right hand wants to move in the opposite direction. Watch here how both hands are participating in the melodic patterns

For speedy completion of long taans spanning multiple octaves.

To double up the sound by playing exactly the same notes that the right hand plays. Watch here how notes are doubled up

Left hand is being used quite commonly on the organ accompaniment in Natya Sangeet. Watch here how

  • A notation sample may be helpful. At least for other site visitors - like myself - who are not familiar with the specifics like chikari, taan, etc. – Michael Curtis Oct 30 at 19:24
  • .. will add pointers into youtube links to visually see some of these at work. Hope that will do. Otherwise to explain in detail and to add scores or notations, it will require a much longer article. – dry leaf Oct 31 at 7:17

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.