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I'm trying to do this:
1. I open FL Studio to play all 88 keys of a piano.
2. FL Studio's Piano Roll begins with C0 which is two octave below C1 of a real piano.
3. So you have to go from C2 up to C9 in order to cover all white and black keys. Like so:
Notes

When I save this pattern as a MIDI file and take to Guitar Pro 7, It becomes kind of chromatic and doesn't seem the way I think. I say, if I'm playing all the notes, It should play all 12 notes of sixth string and then next string and then the next. but, instead, It plays 4 frets of 6th string, 4 frets of 5th, 4 fret of 4th, 3 frets of 3rd! and so on. Why this happens. Hope I'm clear.

  • Odd, 'cos the first octave, using minus numbers, is actually the guitar notes. There should be a little 8 under the treble clef sign, indicating that guitar music is written one octave higher than it's played. It picks up at bottom string open at bar 5's end, then decides to use strings sequentially, starting with each one's open position, (but all in the wrong octave!). Ascending, on one string, by the time you've reached the 5th fret, you're playing the same note as the next string anyway. Carry on, and by 10th fret you're up to the next but one string open note. – Tim Nov 4 '18 at 8:59
  • @Tim Sorry, That was a little vague to me. I'm a total beginner – Messi Nov 4 '18 at 10:47
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This is the normal situation on a guitar tuned to Standard Tuning (EADGBe). The A string is tuned one fourth above the E string. And this interval is just 4 semitones or frets away.

Going from the G string to the B string there are only 3 semitones in the middle. This is because B is a Major third above G. It is a little weird and guitar players all have to get used to it at some point (or tune differently).

So, except for the extreme bottom and top of the range, there are usually several string+fret combinations which will produce the same note. And to play a chromatic scale, you could do it in several different ways

$6.0 1 2 3 4  $5.0 1 2 3 4  $4.0 1 2 3 4 $3.0 1 2 3  $2.0 1 2 3 4  $1.0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12


$6.0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9  $4.0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8  $2.0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9  $1.5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12


$6.0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23  $1.0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

And one more, which probably how I would choose to do it if I wanted the visual effect of moving all the way across the fretboard:

$6.0 1 2 3 4  $5.0  $6.6 7 8 9  $4.0  $5.6 7 8 9  $3.0  $5.11 12 13 14  $4.10 11 12 13  $3.9 10 11 12  $2.9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  • What I get from your comment is that, piano keys and guitar frets don't match at all. Guitar is a hotchpotch of notes. Cause you go linear (from left to right) in piano to make an ascending sound, but in guitar, although the next note might be G you'd better go to next string and play that one! – Messi Nov 4 '18 at 10:36
  • The next note, the G you mention is in more than 1 place. You are correct it is a hogpodge. You could play it on the next fret on the same string or down some frets (depending on what string you are on) on the next string. – b3ko Nov 4 '18 at 12:08
  • Yes, a lot of the difficulty in playing guitar is choosing which place for each note so the whole phrase or song is easier with the least amount of jumping around. I added some examples of chromatic scales on guitar. to the answer – luser droog Nov 4 '18 at 22:10

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