-1

I’ve got 3 speakers but all of them did not play that punchy bass, which is mostly on Southern Rap songs! And by that I mean this! For example

Skip to 0.45
Skip to 0.45 once again.

And many more, Freek-A-Leak, etc So why my speaker didn’t play/recognized that bass? And how can I fix that?

Any help plz? Thanks.

EDIT: @wskerpan Thanks a lot for the reply. Can you please link one speaker for me where I can hear that bass which I mentioned? I will buy. Thank you.

And i'm using ''Multimedia Speakers 2.1 SPA2341'' philips.co.uk/c-p/SPA2341_10/multimedia-speakers-2.1 with ''Frequency 35 - 20 K Hz'' –

  • 1
    There's nowhere near enough information here to help with an answer. Give us some concrete starting points. – Tim Nov 6 '18 at 18:12
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    One could start by telling us some details about your speakers. – user45266 Nov 6 '18 at 18:18
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    And the amplifier, how many watts, etc. – CrossRoads Nov 6 '18 at 18:22
  • Speakers are from Phillips and 60watts. – Mr theonlyhsn Nov 6 '18 at 18:24
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about music theory or practice as outlined in the help center. – Todd Wilcox Nov 6 '18 at 21:39
1

Every speaker has a specific frequency response, that is, how well it is able to reproduce different frequencies between 20Hz to 20kHz (the range of human hearing). Depending on the materials, one speaker may have an excellent frequency response in the low end, while another may only be suited to reproduce high frequencies.

enter image description here

This is an example graph of frequency response taken from the Yamaha Sound Reinforcement Handbook. There are two common formats for notating frequency response. The frequency response of the piece of equipment represented by this graph could be written as

20 Hz to 30 kHz +0, -3dB

because the average level is +0dB and the range spans from 20Hz to 30kHz before the maximum, or tolerance, reaches -3dB. The other way is to limit the range to 20 Hz to 20 kHz and simply state the tolerance at those points.

As a spectral analysis of the first song you linked reveals, right where the bass comes in around 0:45 we can see that almost all the bass is living <100 Hz. enter image description here I was able to easily find a number of Phillips speakers online whose ranges didn't go any lower 110-120 Hz, but I don't know which speakers in particular you are using so I can't tell you for certain that this is your problem. You can, however, try to find your speaker's frequency response rating online, and then we'll know for sure.

  • This is a very good answer. There may be some benefit to adding information about sub woofers vs mains and using crossovers in hi-fi systems, but that may be out of scope for the question. The 'thump' they are looking for is almost certainly coming from a subwoofer at a club or other professional installation – Alex Y Nov 6 '18 at 22:24
  • @wskerpan Thanks a lot for the reply. Can you please link one speaker for me where I can hear that bass which I mentioned? I will buy. Thank you. – Mr theonlyhsn Nov 7 '18 at 4:39
  • And i'm using ''Multimedia Speakers 2.1 SPA2341'' philips.co.uk/c-p/SPA2341_10/multimedia-speakers-2.1 with ''Frequency 35 - 20 K Hz'' – Mr theonlyhsn Nov 7 '18 at 7:13
0

Well, there's nothing 'wrong' with the tracks.

It's not actually massively deep when the long kick comes in [it's not a 'bass' btw, it's just an extended decay kick drum, same on both tracks] so if 3 sets of speakers are distorting the same way - look to your amp.

If that's just a PC output, then turn it down... they're generally f... sh... ermm... cra... errr... not very good ;-)

If you can independently turn up the amp/speaker combo to regain your overall volume, then try that instead - I'm guessing it's just too much for the PC's op amp.

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