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Does the same rhythm from "Row, row, row your boat" copy the ending of Telemann's Concerto?

It appears lots of music copied the style of the Baroque era.

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    Are we sure that the melody of "row, row, row your boat" wasn't written in the Baroque era? – phoog Nov 21 '18 at 21:52
  • @phoog I edited the question. – Jossie Calderon Nov 22 '18 at 0:59
  • I’m reading the score, you must be talking about the triplet arpeggio- merrily merrily merrily merrily? – Richard Barber Nov 22 '18 at 10:23
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    Can you point us to a specific timepoint in a video to show us what section you're referencing? – Richard Nov 22 '18 at 15:00
  • @Richard youtube.com/watch?v=jWhAwQgcjgg&t=433s – Jossie Calderon Nov 23 '18 at 18:51
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The same rhythm does appear, but only briefly. The relationship is a result of this rhythm and the fact that the Telemann uses the same or similar scale degrees as "Row." "Row" begins with repeated instances of scale-degree 1 (what we call the tonic of the key), and that's exactly what's repeated at the beginning of your clip. And since "Row" is so culturally ingrained, it's easy to hear a passing connection when we hear the Telemann. The subsequent triplets, even though they're on different scale degrees in the Telemann, add to the the similarity.

It's a lot like how people often tend to hear "Jingle Bells" at the end of Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony. Even though the scale degree is wrong (it's 3 in "Jingle Bells" but 5 in the Shostakovich), the rhythm is so ingrained in our memories that we immediately make the connection.

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