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I often face this problem: Let's say I'm on the 12th fret of the G string with my index finger placed on it. Now I want to move on to 12th fret of the B string, so basically just below the one I was pushing down. The problem is that everytime I move my index finger from the G string to B, the open G string plays. It's just one of many other situations similar to this that happens like all the time.

I try to figure it out but maybe you know some techniques that just work and I can apply to my playing. I'd be bery happy if you could share them with me.

So how can I prevent this from happening?

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Several ideas. If your fingers are damp, it can make an open string re-sound as you take them off. You may be inadvertently moving your finger sideways, so plucking the string with its tip. (Quite an advanced technique!). By using a different finger, it's good to release the original gently, but still keep touching the string, so damping it. Be careful not to sound the 12th fret harmonic here though. A lot of players damp unused strings with their plucking hand palm. On electric a good way to hone this skill is to turn up the volume, and/or use overdrive, so some feedback is created, then use palm-muting to quieten all unused strings.

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    Thanks for your ideas, Tim! Could you say something more about this advanced technique you mentioned? Or was that a joke? haha :) – Toby Dec 18 '18 at 14:57
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    No joke! It's part of two hand tapping. EVH made it popular way back, although he didn't invent it. It involves tapping (hammer-ons) and pull-offs with both hands, depending how it's done. – Tim Dec 18 '18 at 15:11
  • Oh ok, now I get it. Thanks for your answer :) – Toby Dec 18 '18 at 15:18
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Try putting your finger over both strings at the 12th fret, or just use one finger for each string. Play 12th on the G with your first finger and 12th of the B with your second finger.

  • Yep I thought about that, but did not know if this is "correct". – Toby Dec 20 '18 at 7:21

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