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One of my cousins live in Australia and whenever she writes down musical notes, she uses the German notation instead of the standard English. For example, instead of using ♭ (C♭, D♭, E♭, F♭, G♭, A♭, B♭) , she writes "es" (Ces, Des, Es, Fes, Ges, As, B) . She will also write the keys in German (ex. "fis-moll" for f♯-minor) . When I asked her why she writes them that way, she answered that she was instructed by someone who uses the German notation.


So the question is: Do people in Australia use the German notation?

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    Mind that they are multiculti. I have a facebook-friend in australia the "yodelling maria" from AUSTRIA. She seems not to be the only one beside the English migrated. The english surely are using ♭. (I've copied ♭ from your question, how can I type it with my keyboard of win 10? I know it was explained in the meta, but I didn't understand the codes ...) – Albrecht Hügli Feb 27 '19 at 11:03
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    Well, the THING is, sometimes when she uses the German notation, it really confuses me. Especially, the "B♭-B" and "B-H" is EXTREMELY confusing! – user53472 Feb 27 '19 at 11:04
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    and what do you think it is for all german, that all the english american use the B insted of the H? :) The mass of Bach is called H-moll Messe. What it is in English? B-minor. But I explained to my pupils at school (from 9 to 17 years) it would be more logical to use the English spelling but there are still other points where you have to be flexilby thinking in music. – Albrecht Hügli Feb 27 '19 at 11:10
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The "German" notation is a notation applied in several European countries. We use it in Denmark. In this system B is called H and B♭ is called B. This means that you get the idea in compositions that applies the 4 notes B-A-C-H. Several composers use that sequense of notes in a composition inclusive Bach himself.

Anyway, the normal notation in Australia is the same as in other English speaking countries. I know that from an Australian musician.

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The German notation is not in common usage in Australia.

Source: Am Australian.

There's a lot of German influence in South Australia (the state) particularly. So there's potential for some people to use it. However, even in South Australia, I've never heard it. The average musician here tends to use a mix of British and American conventions.

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  • Nice! Is Sydney in South Australia? Because my cousin lives in Sydney. – user53472 Mar 13 '19 at 23:57
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    @MaikaSakuranomiya Nah, Sydney is about 1400km away from South Australia. That being said, there are plenty of German people in Syndey too. The influence is just more prevalent in South Australia. – endorph Mar 14 '19 at 0:11
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Seems you've answered your own question: the cousin in question uses the German notation. Extrapolation to the population from a single instance is bad mathematics :-) . What this means is this: you know for sure that there is one person in Australia who uses German notation. You know nothing about the rest of the population. However, that is true ("know nothing") for the entire population of China, or Japan, or Paraguay. As such, your question has no functional value - it's got nothing to do with Australia per se . There is no reason to expect any country, with the faintly possible exception of Germany, has a significant number of musicians who work with German notation.

commentary

At some point, every musician (at least in the classical world) has to learn not only the standard Italian but also German and French notation (the latter being mostly the associated terminologies), how to read those crazy French scores where the eighth-rest symbols are backwards, and so on. It's the music-world equivalent of the (thousands of) different spoken languages and text characters used around the world.

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    This does not answer my question. Sorry. – user53472 Feb 27 '19 at 14:10
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    This response really doesn't make sense. First you say that the OP answered their own question by demonstrating that one Australian uses German notation, then you say that we need a larger sample size to know the answer... Why respond if you don't know the answer the question? – Peter Feb 27 '19 at 15:42
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    This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. - From Review – user45266 Feb 27 '19 at 15:56
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    @CarlWitthoft I mean that you're contradicting yourself. You admit that we know of one person in Australia who uses this notation, then you say "There is no reason to expect any country ... has a significant number of musicians who work with German notation." Do you have any evidence about the second part, or are you just guessing? – Peter Feb 27 '19 at 19:20
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    @CarlWitthoft The OP didn't make any claim though, they just asked a question. They didn't make an a priori assumption, instead they offered evidence (in the form of a cousin). You're the one making the a priori assumption - you don't know if there are people in Australia who use German notation, you're just assuming there aren't. – Peter Feb 27 '19 at 20:44

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