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enter image description here

I'm composing a piano piece and I'm trying to make the accompaniment.

I made this arpeggio and I had this thought that

the Bb/F might not be a Bb/F.

Because it's starting from the Bb.

But what if I hold down the pedal for the entire measure.

would that make a Bb/F ?

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If you hold down the sustain pedal for the whole measure you'll get a mess!

If you find a way to sustain the low F you can call it F, Bb/F. Or, more accurately, F, Bbmaj7/F.

You could 'half-pedal' it. But that works best when the note to be sustained is clearly in a lower register than the ones to be damped. Or you just MIGHT have a big enough hand to play it literally!

Even if you don't sustain the F, the harmonic intention can still be F, Bbmaj7/F. Particularly if the first note of the NEXT bar is also low F.

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If you held the pedal for the whole bar it would make a mess. There's an F major for the first two beats, then a Bbmaj7 for the other two. All far too muddy. Yes, it may constitute Bbmaj7/F, but it's not good music. With a sostenuto pedal, it's quite feasible, and would work and sound good. But then the first F note would not be a quaver - it'd be a semibreve.

Maybe there's too much theoretical thinking going on. Please remember, theory came about as a way to explain what happened. It's not something to be adhered to, or even as a check-up on what's been played. That second chord is simply Bbmaj7, if you need a label.

And - we don't know what else is going on in r.h., so we're pretty well in the dark.

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the Bb/F might not be a Bb/F. Because it's starting from the Bb.

Yes, it's a Bb/F

But what if I hold down the pedal for the entire measure.

would that make a Bb/F ?

That's a bad Idea. Why hold the pedal for the entire measure? It will sound pretty wrong for this style.

You need to change the pedal at beat 3 for the new chord.

  • how is that a Bb/F – Hyun Yoo Park Mar 10 at 16:51
  • it's actually a Bb Maj7:Bb,D,F,A (2nd inversion) if you hold the pedal from the 1st beat you will have BbCDFABb. Well, if you really want to hold it - you can do it. It's not absolutely terryfing. :) – Albrecht Hügli Mar 10 at 17:33
  • I'm asking "HOW" is that a 2nd inversion if I don't hold down the pedal – Hyun Yoo Park Mar 11 at 0:14
  • I think Albrecht Hügli meant to say 'first inversion'. But it's an arpeggio. It doesn't really hang together for long enough to be usefully called an inversion. – Laurence Payne Mar 11 at 0:33
  • Yes, laurence, the first, of course. Thank you! - But when he holds the pedal? – Albrecht Hügli Mar 11 at 0:34
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The arpeggio you labeled B♭/F, if it's distinct from the first arpeggio, does not have F at the bottom, so it's not B♭/F. The second half of the measure is actually forming a B♭maj7 chord. If you're sustaining over the whole measure, you would end up with an F6add11 at the end. It's not that messy. (Or maybe you could call it B♭maj9/F. There is no context, so it's hard to say.) In any case, the second chord symbol isn't representative of what's going on.

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Given what you wrote it seems your are arpeggiating these chords...

enter image description here

...where D is the bass of the second chord.

It seems Bb/D would be the label to use.

But the ambiguity of whether the F bass of the first chord is somehow held or implied under the second depends a lot on what happens in the third chord.

To illustrate the point I made up a C chord for the third chord. With that change to C I think a Bb/D label is sensible.

You could do something else that would make different labels more appropriate.

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