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I'm just wondering if any female singers can answer these related questions.

Why do some female singers breathe out in on the mic and what is this called? Are there any techniques for calming the breathing down for a female pop singer/dancer after a concert? If you have any instructional video of how you do it?

What is it called when a female singer moves the mic away from her mouth in concert to breathe out and in and then move it back? I have seen some singers do it poorly. They breathe out on the mic, move it away and then move it back to breathe in.

  • "why do they breathe out in on the mic and what is this called?" Do you mean exhaling into the mic? Or just singing with a breathy tone? – user45266 Apr 15 '19 at 17:06
  • And re: Arsak, I'm not entirely sure that that "breathe in and out" was what OP meant. It could be, but I want OP to clarify that for us. – user45266 Apr 15 '19 at 17:09
  • Have you considered phrasing the question where these two contrasting techniques are entirely intentional? 1. Audibly breathing into the mic 2. Swinging away from the mic to take a breath, inaudibly. Tags: Performing, History are recommended and I do hope a female vocalist decides to answer this question after it is modified. – Rene Marcelo Apr 16 '19 at 19:44
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Why do some female singers breathe out [and] in on the mic and what is this called?

This is called "panting" and it is generally only done on purpose in pop-music. When it is done intentionally, it is usually to simulate the sounds of sex and the female orgasm. Sex sells and it is a prevalent theme in pop (before it became a musical genre "Rock & Roll" was jive-talk/jazz-slang for sex. Back when jazz was "pop.") Otherwise, rhythmic breathing is sometimes used as an atonal, percussive sound - which could possibly be argued as being termed "vocable" but, I think that's a big stretch of the term's actual meaning.

If panting into the microphone is unintentional, it is for the purpose of thermoregulation. The only phrases that apply to this are "lack of breath control" or "losing one's breath."

Are there any techniques for calming the breathing down for a female pop singer/dancer after a concert? If you have any instructional video of how you do it?

Techniques for catching one's breath are no different for a singer than for an athlete or any other human being on Earth, for the matter. There are techniques for increasing and enhancing breath control. A simple online search for 'breath control' will turn up lots of results.

What is it called when a female singer moves the mic away from her mouth in concert to breathe out and in and then move it back? I have seen some singers do it poorly. They breathe out on the mic, move it away and then move it back to breathe in.

Again, this is simply called "breathing" or "catching a breath." There is no technique involved and doing so does not require any talent whatsoever... it is the most natural and involuntary response when one's lungs run out of air. Any singer (male or female) that moves away from a microphone and back in order to breathe is simply either attempting to keep the breathing noise out of the microphone or they are just adding a bit of 'drama' to the performance and/or emphasis to the lyrics...

If a singer is unable to keep their breath out of the microphone (unintentionally,) then it is likely due to fatigue. Otherwise, they probably don't care about the breath noise and by moving away from the mic and back they, again, are just adding a bit of 'drama' to the performance, adding emphasis to the lyrics, or simply feeling the music and expressing that fact with body movement.

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They might be consciously 'working the mic' in order to either minimise unwanted breathing sound, or in order to feature it because it sounds emotional.

Or they may be gasping for breath, oblivious to the fact that the mic is picking it up.

Bad mic technique, or good mic technique.

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