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I use Fender cc60-sce semi-acoustc guitar and Vox mini 5 rhythm amplifier .The amp has 3 modes 0.1W,1.5W and 5W.When I switch to 1.5 W or 5W my guitar's B string starts vibrating rapidly and makes a weird noise and it keeps on vibrating until you mute it by your hand or switch back to 0.1 W.Any solution?

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    Seems normal to me. Generally it’s a good idea to keep all strings muted unless you’re playing them. – Todd Wilcox May 2 at 7:33
  • Is this purely a function of gain setting, or can you make it happen at 0.1W with your speaker/amp turned way up as well? This will tell you whether it's local or remote feedback. – Carl Witthoft May 2 at 12:11
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Acoustic and semi acoustic guitars are prone to this sort of phenomenon - feedback. It's caused by sympathetic vibration, where an open string 'hears' its own pitch, gets excited by it, and starts to vibrate in sympathy. It ay be the guitar itself, or something in the room, that picks up on that frequency. At that point, the two sounds egg each other on.

Obviously, less volume stops it happening so much in the first instance, so turning down guiar and/or amp will stop it. As Todd says, muting (any) strings not played is always a good move for amplified guitars. Moving closer to the speaker probably makes it worse - so moving away should improve things.

As an experiment, try it in a different room, guitar away from amp/speaker. Also, try tuning to Eb instead, listen to the difference. It may just be that your guitar's body's natural frequency is B.

  • It dosen't happen with my electric guitar.So this problem is only for semi acoustic? – ROHAN PAUL May 2 at 8:46
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    @ROHANPAUL semi acoustic guitars tend to pick up sound energy from the air and pass it to the strings more, so this is more of a problem for acoustic and semi-acoustic instruments. However, it does happen with solid-body electric instruments too - that's how the classic guitar 'feedback' sound happens! – topo morto May 2 at 9:26
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    Solid objects don't vibrate much - that's one reason why solid bodied guitars are so popular. Acoustic and semi-acoustic guitars have thin wood for their bodies - or part of them. Thin wood will vibrate much more easily, thus your problem. You could dampen the wood with tape etc., on the inside, but that's not a particularly good idea, for the wood, and the sound of the guitar. – Tim May 2 at 9:37
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Angle your amp away from the guitar.

Αs @Tim said, it is feedback from sympathetic vibrations. But that probably doesn’t help you too much. But it is a loop of the sound going from the amp back into the guitar back out of the amp and back into the guitar over and over until you mute the string or prevent the amp from being able to vibrate the string.

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    What's the cause of the problem? – ROHAN PAUL May 2 at 7:50
  • @ROHANPAUL as Tim said, it is feedback from sympathetic vibrations. But that probably doesn’t help you too much. But it is a loop of the sound going from the amp back into the guitar back out of the amp and back into the guitar over and over until you mute the string or prevent the amp from being able to vibrate the string. – Timinycricket May 2 at 8:45
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    @Timinycricket I added your comment to the answer, because it's good to explain why he needs to angle his amp away from the guitar – Shevliaskovic May 2 at 11:01

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