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I am writing, because I would like to know if you might be in a position to help me with the following: I am trying to find audio recordings of things like the major and minor guitar scales that I may be able to download onto my mp3 player so I can train my ear and familiarize myself with all the major, minor, harmonic, melodic, etc scales.

Do you know where I might be able to find such recordings? I have tried Youtube, but I usually receive more complex results; people offering more complex info on the subject rather than this simple type of audio information/track.

I apologize if I am overreaching with my question, but I am just starting to learn theory, and I am looking for help. Theory has made me realize that there is a way to listen to music previously unavailable: listening as someone who is literate rather than illiterate for example.

closed as off-topic by David Bowling, Peter, Shevliaskovic, Richard, Dekkadeci May 19 at 15:37

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you even find mp3 of scales in wikipedia.

But why learn them by listening? As you have a guitar you could

  1. learn the intervals of the scales (writing a schema)
  2. play them on your guitar
  3. try to sing them and controle it with the guitar

you can also record your singing with the syllabls of do re mi that will help you a lot and also sing all intervals starting the root and always go back as e.g. minor harmonic: la-ti-la-do-la-re-la-mi-la-fe-la-se-la-la up and down, or all thirds, 4th etc. (as e.g. do mi re fa mi so fa la ...)

you will profit much more by training your ear, your fingers and orientation on the guitar and even your voice and especially you will better understand the scales instead of just listening at them.)

  • Thanks for taking the time to answer my question. It was a way for me to increase the level of exposure when I am away from the guitar that it all. – Gonzalo I. Gil. May 3 at 16:53
  • I know, I used to do so when I was studying figured bass. but the were no mp3 players and any internet. I recorded the exercices and carried a taperecorder with me (or was it a walkman - who knows?) – Albrecht Hügli May 3 at 16:57
  • Yes, that is the idea I had in mind. A supplement of sorts – Gonzalo I. Gil. May 3 at 19:02

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