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I want to ask why nobody plays for example, F# half diminished chord on piano with 2145 fingering on right hand. Everybody plays 1235 or 1245. I think better to use 2 at the bottom because you can reach lower notes on piano with right hand and high notes are also comfortable with 2. Am I wrong?

  • Did you mean 2345? – Your Uncle Bob May 29 at 0:16
  • 2345 is also an option – prako2 May 29 at 5:44
  • Generally, there is suggested fingering for arpeggios (and songs), but if something else works for you, you can use that – Shevliaskovic May 29 at 5:50
  • So, would you play f# half diminished chord 1235 1235 long arpeggio? I probably would play 2123 4123. In short arpeggio I would probably use 2145 or 2345 because of better range ability of low notes – prako2 May 29 at 5:58
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    1235 works fine for the chord itself. I sense you are not just playibg a simple chord but playing arpeggios. You have to give us some sheet music. We dont seem to understand you. I dont anyway – Hank May 29 at 15:25
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The general answer has to be that most people can't reach! Personally, using index on F♯ and thumb on A (other notes C and E with whatever's remaining) is impossible as a block chord with R.H.

Arpeggiating may give that option of 2145, but that's not made clear in the question. There's always the 'rule' that says thumb is best on white keys, as it's generally shorter than the fingers.

The basic idea with any fingering is to do what is most comfortable, practical and logical, and because there are so mant variants of hand physiology, there will also be variants as to how exactly a player fingers certain notes/chords/passages.

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As always, talk to an experienced teacher. In many cases, the choice of fingering depends on how you enter or leave that chord in the piece being played. In other cases, there are fingerings which may seem awkward at first but cause much less strain on your fingers or wrists. Avoiding biophysical damage is important!

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