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Is the basic principle of Pat Martino's Diminished Concept for chord construction anything more than simply altering diminished chords?

closed as too broad by David Bowling, user45266, Shevliaskovic, Peter, Doktor Mayhem Jun 10 at 22:04

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Do you just want a summary of Martino's work along with an evaluation of it? Because that's too broad... – user45266 Jun 9 at 1:48
  • And what would be an appropriate scope? – pro Jun 9 at 5:37
  • Asking about specific principles, rather than all of them. I don't think we're going to explain an entire book/movie/whatever here if that concept is so mulitfaceted that they have to be lumped together. – user45266 Jun 9 at 6:19
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    I think summaries are possible at varying levels, and there is a way to answer this question in a format appropriate for this site. This article might be partly what you're looking for: http://www.patmartino.com/Articles/GuitarPlayer_April_2004.pdf – jdjazz Jun 9 at 16:28
  • If this question is closed for being too broad then should this question be closed as well? music.stackexchange.com/questions/85717/… – pro Jun 10 at 22:52
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From How does Pat Martino's Minor Concept relate to his Diminished Concept? :

The so-called diminished concept is just a way of memorizing the shapes of the four inversions of dominant seventh chords by lowering one of the four notes of the diminished chord.

By its symmetrical structure, the four inversions of the diminished chord have the same shape on the guitar, that's why they're easy to remember. This is not the case with other seventh chords (and other 4-part chords in general). The special thing about the dominant seventh chord is that it can be easily constructed from a diminished chord by lowering one note. E.g., from an Edim7 chord in a drop-2 shape on the top four strings

X X 2 3 2 3

we can easily construct the four dominant seventh chords

Eb7: X X 1 3 2 3

Gb7: X X 2 3 2 2

A7: X X 2 2 2 3

C7: X X 2 3 1 3

The additional chords can be generated by altering other degrees of the chord, such as is discussed in Where can I find a complete list of 3 note Freddie Green jazz chords?

Further discussion of the Pat Martino "Diminished Concept" aka "Sacred Geometry" can be found at http://www.patmartino.com/Articles/GuitarPlayer_April_2004.pdf

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