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Good day,

I don't remember and cannot find any information about the "formula" I got from my music teacher very long time ago which establish a simple chord progression, let's say in C

C major, D minor, E minor, F major, G major, A minor, B dim

So, why the 2nd, 3rd and 6th chords are minor?

Any suggestion would be really appreciated

Thank you

Martin

marked as duplicate by Tim H, Dom Aug 14 at 12:37

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Due to each triad being made up from 'stacked thirds' using diatonic notes.

Let's take each in turn: C E G =Cmaj. D F A =Dm. E G B= Em. F A C = Fmaj. G B D =Gmaj. A C E = Am. B D F=Bo.

Dm Em and Am are all minors because their thirds (F G and C respectively) are all minor thirds Were they major chords, those notes would be F♯, G♯ and C♯ respectively. None of which is in the notes diatonic to C major.

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