2

Question

My band recently printed a brand new pep band flip book and we are required to make edits to the songs so that they are shorter. Since the books are nice and new I am curious as to if their is a better way to delete and skip measures than simply crossing them off and/or drawing arrows. Currently, allot of people use a combination of brackets, numbers, arrows, and crossing things off. I would just use the Coda symbol, but that is technically improper. Perhaps I should just go with "to measure X"?

Example

  • Song 1.long/original is 20 measures long.

  • Song 1.A is from measures 1 to 8.

  • Song 1.B is from measures 11 to 15 and skip to measures 19 to 20.

  • Song 1.C is from measures 5 to 12 and skip to measures 19 to 20.

  • 2
    How is the coda technically improper? Are crossing out and arrows, or “go to” more proper? – b3ko Sep 4 '19 at 12:10
  • Good point, except the coda already has a musical definition and I was wondering if their was a method that was common/formal and well defined. – BobSaidHi Sep 4 '19 at 22:48
1

There is no standardized system for this. Anything that works for you -- "to X", or even a coda symbol -- is fine.

Allowing the book will be only used by you, then you just want to make sure your markings are easy to follow at a glance. To add a possibility to the ones you mentioned, you could color-code (e.g., highlight or under-/over-line) the played parts.

If the book is something that others will also use, then you'll want non-permanent markings. So, light pencil. Consider covering the unplayed parts with post-it notes rather than Xs.

For the best of all worlds, make your own copies. Either just make copies to mark up however you like, or cover the skipped measures with blank paper and then copy. In the latter case, you'll wind up with a "clean" version for yourself, and an unmarked original if needed.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.