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Wikipedia has an article on the 7/6 chord. It only shows chords built on major triads with added major sixth and minor seventh intervals. For example, a C7/6 chord is comprised of C E G A B♭.

How far is this notation taken? Consider these possibilities:

Cm7/6 - C E♭ G A B♭

Cmaj7/6 - C E G A B

Cmmaj7/6 - C E♭ G A B

C+7/6 - C E G♯ A B♭

C+maj7/6 - C E G♯ A B

Cø7/6 - C E♭ G♭ A B♭

These can certainly be parsed without ambiguity, but are they better-written (or written in a more standard fashion) as Cm7(add6), Cmaj7(add6) and so forth?

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    Can't say I've ever come across a 7/6 chord written as such. It comes close to what I'd play for a 13th chord, mainly as dominant 13. 7/6 is what Dad paid for his marriage licence! – Tim Oct 13 at 2:32
  • Whenever you see a sixth in a chord, consider if it could be better notated as rooted in the sixth note. All your examples here could be a variant of A C E G B which is a more standard extended chord, a 9th. – AJFaraday Oct 13 at 6:45
  • Of course it could still be rooted in the C. Am9/C, for instance. – AJFaraday Oct 13 at 6:47
  • @AJFaraday - that then becomes an Am9. If it is indeed a 'C chord' it'll often have root underneath, so will be called Am9/C – Tim Oct 13 at 6:48
  • @AJFaraday - funny, that... – Tim Oct 13 at 6:49
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In the notation for chords in jazz, if a chord has 2 modifications, isn't it usual to write last the modification that's furthest from the root? If that's the case here, then your C 7 6 is really C 7 13, the 13 (the A) being a substitute for 5 (G). Typically in a chord of the 13th, the 13th would be voiced above the 7th.

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    I've just remembered that classical has it the other way round: a triad in 2nd inversion is called a six-four chord, not a four-six chord. – Rosie F Oct 13 at 6:22
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    Any number larger than 7 attached to a chord automatically includes that 7. (Not 'add' numbers). – Tim Oct 13 at 6:45
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    I also think X 7 13 is usual. – Albrecht Hügli Oct 13 at 9:07
  • @RosieF that a six-four chord is so called is presumably because the 6 is written above the 4, just as the higher pitch in staff notation is above the lower, and we more naturally read from top to bottom than from bottom to top. – phoog Oct 13 at 16:30
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The picture wikipedia shows is actually a root tone with the sixth and the seventh close together. So it seems not to be meant a C 7 13.

But I also never ever came across this notation. (In the final chord of a piece we can often hear a root 7 9 13 chord...)

In music, a seven six chord is a chord containing both factors a sixth and a seventh above the root, making it both an added chord and a seventh chord. However, the term may mean the first inversion of an added ninth chord (E–G–C–D).1 It can be written as 7/6 and 7,6.[2] It can be represented by the integer notation {0, 4, 7, 9, 10}.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_six_chord

To answer your question:

How far is this notation taken? Consider these possibilities:

Cm7/6 - C E♭ G A B♭

Cmaj7/6 - C E G A B

I don't know whether I like to hear this one: Cmmaj7/6 - C E♭ G A B

I'd say eventually your first 2 examples. But I wouldn't like to listen at the others!

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