3

What chord does "D#07" refer to? I'd guess it's a kind of D# or D#7?

/Em              C       /D                          /Em  /    /
 Baby, I've been waiting, I've been waiting night and day.
Em               Cmaj7/D               /Em           /
I didn't see the time, I waited half my life away.
          /D                  /D                     /D#07 /B+7
There were lots of invitations and I know you sent me some,
12

Looks as if it could be a diminished seventh. On D#, the notes would be D#, F#, A and C. The customary notation is a superscript circle, but perhaps whoever printed the sheet music you saw couldn't produce that character and so typed a zero instead.

  • Can I ask: Would the following B+7 be a B augmented 7th chord? – Anna Oct 20 at 8:45
  • @Anna - more than likely! The B+7 keeps D# and A from the D#o chord, changing only the F# and C to Fx and B respectively, then to Em. B7 (and B+7) changes to E/Em 9 times out of 8... – Tim Oct 20 at 8:49
  • Thank you Tim! Maybe I should make a habit out of spelling out the notes to see how they move through chord changes. I've just learnt by heart how the notes move from V7 to I, no other chords. – Anna Oct 20 at 8:53
  • 4
    Or maybe the chord is actually meant to be half-diminished (ø), and they tried to express that by 0 which is sometimes rendered with a slash through it?? – anatolyg Oct 20 at 16:57
  • 2
    Thank you @anatolyg, that would have made sense too! I've found proper sheet music for this song (Waiting for the Miracle by Cohen and Sharon Robinson), and there it's written as D#dim7. – Anna Oct 21 at 3:56
5

D#07 means D#o7 whereby the o should be written like a degree sign: uppercase! If I copy it from this link it is written normally, I know how to type it in word, but in SE it doesn't work:

D#o7 = D#°7 = dim7, stands for diminished seventh chord: root, min 3rd, dim 5th, dim 7th

The notes of D# dim7 are D#,F#,A,C

As you can see it is related to the B 9 chord - without root tone.

Edit:

every (vii o7) can be considered as a (V b9) without root and like the B+7 is probably a secondary dom. 7b9 chord to e-minor the 5th of this chord can be augmented for both progressions: D# dim7 and B7 => B +7 (the + is related to the fifth and means B 7 (#5)

  • 2
    Please check first three 'words'! And B9 usually has C# rather than C. – Tim Oct 20 at 8:50
  • Thank you for pointing out the relation to B9, interesting! Is there some insight to be gained from that in this particular case, e.g. the relating to the following Baug7? – Anna Oct 20 at 9:15
  • I meant to give this hint too: every (vii o7) can be considered as a V7) without root and like the B+7 is probably a secondary dom.7 chord to e-minor the 5th of this chord can be augmented for both progressions: D# dim7 and B7 => B +7 (the + is related to the fifth and means B 7 (#5) – Albrecht Hügli Oct 20 at 9:36
  • 1
    Regarding "every (vii o7) can be considered as a V7) without root", don't you mean "V(b)9 without root"? – Dekkadeci Oct 20 at 13:16
  • 1
    FYI, to get that or other symbols in SE, you can use Character Map (Windows) or Key Caps (Mac) and pick them from the chart: ° (degree symbol) or º (superscript zero). – Darrel Hoffman Oct 21 at 13:32
4

It's a diminished seventh chord. A diminished chord consists of root, m3, d5, as in C E♭ G♭, or in the case above it would be D♯o - D♯ F♯ A.

Adding a seventh to this produces the diminished seventh chord. Using D♯ as the root, it will be C.

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