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How does one find chord progressions of the track?

I'm trying to find the sequence to:

melody starts at 3:26 min.

All I could fine :

Key of song is E minor,
bass root notes : E A C D

Thanks in advance

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  • Are you trying to figure out the progression that is recorded or make up a suitable progression based on the melody? It is not clear from your question. – ggcg Oct 28 '19 at 22:04
  • Thanks for your respond . basically i would like to learn notes for melody, i'm trying to figure out progression that is recorded. – freeagent Oct 28 '19 at 22:10
  • Progression usually refers to the chords that support the melody rather than the notes of the melody themselves. Based on what I hear there is not a lot of melody in this, it's very percussive and synth style. Hard to hear. Did you figure out E A C D by ear, or looking it up? – ggcg Oct 28 '19 at 22:12
  • I've played on midi keyboard to find out bass root notes..... I want to catch the emotion as i'm hearing on melody.. But no luck because i can't figure out progression that is recorded. – freeagent Oct 28 '19 at 22:20
  • My answer was relating to your question * how can I find chord progression* but your English seems to be even more rudimentary than mine. I understand now that you are asking: what chords are in this video? Questions like this are not answered here. But to say it clearly: the melody notes are - if I remember - A E F# G A -.... sometimes there is even a C somewhere. But there's no chord progression at all, as it es all on the same chord: e-minor. – Albrecht Hügli Sep 4 '20 at 12:25
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Since you know the melody and the bass notes, I think your best bet is to infer the chords from those two voices. At minimum, given a bass note and the melody that goes with it, you should be able to figure out by ear, or with a little experimentation, whether the basic harmony is major or minor.

Assuming as a starting point that each chord is a basic major or minor triad, then once you know the chord quality, there are at most three possibilities to try: one where the bass note is the root of the chord, one where the bass note is the third of the chord, and one where the bass note is the fifth.

Given the repetitive nature of the song, and the small number of bass note/harmony changes, this sort of brute force search shouldn't be too bad.

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Em, Am, C, D

The melody uses notes from G major scale

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  • Could we also think of it as using the notes of the E minor scale? – Richard Sep 3 '20 at 13:10
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If you have no ear training to recognize the chord progression of a simple song you must play and listen to even more elementary chord progressions. This basics will be the elements and modules with which you will build other songs, your own progressions and identify the chords of any song.

Look up for songs typing just some roman numbers like “I vi IV V songs”. Listen to these songs until this progression this schema becomes a utility for recognition of similar songs.

You’ll also find other patterns in this SE site looking for chords and chord progression.

This is not the pattern of your song: I vi IV V

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_songs_containing_the_50s_progression

but it may show how you can train your chord progression recognizing skills.

Heres another check:

I iii IV V songs

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How to find out chords:

Listen to the sounds

Identify 7 notes from a scale

Focus on the Bass (lowest note). 99% of the time it will be the root of the chord

Sometimes we need a jazzy approach if the chord has 4+ notes

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