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I've been having trouble getting my strings properly intonated, and it seems like it's because the saddles are getting stuck. What it looks like is that they're pressed against each other so tightly that it's causing resistance. It's bad enough that I accidentally stripped the screw for the G-string saddle while trying to move it closer to the bridge.

Is this normal? If not, what can I do about it? It's a Squier guitar, so I'm wondering if it's just because its a cheaper tremolo assembly. In that case, I could easy solve my problem by upgrading the part.

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Loosening the string before moving the saddle is a good move. I can't remember ever having to do that though. If the individual string blocks are touching each other so tightly that they bind, take them off and file their edges to solve that. A spot of lubrication wouldn't go amiss - try graphite - rub a pencil 'lead' over the offending edges. A pic might give us more clues.

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  • I recently watched Philip McKnight's video on intonating an electric guitar (youtu.be/mn3Zl-4IGsg), and he also recommends detuning the string before moving the saddle. So, after installing a new tremolo assembly (I wanted a better tremolo block, anyway), I tried doing it that way. It's actually really a lot easier! – 1dareu2mov3 Jan 5 at 20:32

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