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Is fingering choice correct in this score La Moldau : right hand : 4 followed by 2 in an increasing scale, in the measure 8th : 6th and 7th note.

https://www.free-scores.com/PDF/smetana-bedrich-vltava-la-moldau-68511.pdf enter image description here

(remark : I use piano, but it maybe it seems that the score is not for piano ?)

Bonus question : enter image description here when a eighth note is staccato in this score, should I play it as if it would be a sixteenth note ? If so, why isn't it directly written directly written a sixteenth note, without writing staccato ? I have the feeling that a staccato eight note is no more a eight note : it transforms a sixteenth note (?)

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When a published fingering appears questionable, the performer should take it upon themselves to alter it to suit their individual needs. In this case and others that appear to implement scales as part of the melody, the fingering would be improved by mapping the the notes to standard scale fingering, e.g., fingering from Hanon or other acknowledged sources. In general, this both makes the fingering more intuitive and also greatly aids pattern recognition and retention for performance. On the piano keyboard, following a key struck by the fourth finger by a key to be struck by the second (index) finger seems awkward. In general, published fingering for any piece should be used as a guideline, not a rule. We were not all born with hands like Duke Ellington's, and need to adapt.

enter image description here

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First question. Don't believe published fingerings! They might well suit the editor, but no-one's hands are the same shape, as has already been pointed out. Work out your own - this has two advantages: you end up with something that works for you, and as you're doing this quite slowly you get to know the music better.

This piece wasn't originally for piano - it's a piano reduction of an orchestral piece by Smetana - 'Vltava' ('Moldau' in German - no idea why) from 'Ma Vlast' ('My country'). So there might be passages which are not ideally set out for the pianist.

On the second question, a staccato isn't necessarily half the length of the written duration. It's up to you to decide how long or short you make it. If you get hold of the orchestral score, the first note is played by the flute, and also the harp, which is why the arranger has put it into the left hand - you'll get a slightly different tone-colour that way. Personally, I'd play it more legato to link it with the f# in the right hand - it's a legato flute tune. The last left-hand chord is marked 'Violons pizz' (i.e. 'plucked'), so should be quite short, probably less than a 16th note.

But in the end it's up to you. Playing orchestral reductions is really hard work (I have to do a lot of it, as an accompanist). It's worth while getting to listen to the original orchestral version so you can hear the effects you're trying to achieve.

Have fun!

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    certainly did research on this reply that was significantly more specific than mine. His attention to understanding the intent of this particular transcription is invaluable and can be applied across a wide range of material. – Francis Phillips Dec 26 '19 at 19:04
  • Thank you both for your explanations – Mathieu Krisztian Dec 27 '19 at 13:35
  • That's very kind of you. I just had a look at the first few pages (on screen), and it's seriously difficult. Those repeated Bs at the bottom of the second page are totally unpianistic and rather make my point; they aren't even in the orchestral score! And good luck with the parallel sixths... – Peter Dec 28 '19 at 10:07

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