4

Since a few months I started with a new piano teacher, and I like it a lot so far! She corrected my fingering technique in the following passage from Ludvig Schytte.

Ludvig Schytte

I'm only concerted about the left hand here. Before, I used to play it like this:

t1: strike keys G, E
t2: lift keys G, E
t3: strike keys G, D
t4: lift keys G, D
t5: strike keys C, E

She thought me to play it like this:

t1: stike keys G, E
t2: lift G
t3: stike G and D, lift E
t4: <do nothing new>
t5: lift G and D, stike C, E

This is a great insight for me.

I always like to repeat my theory lessons by finding something similar on the internet. Does anyone know an online resource that teaches this?

  • 1
    When you write <do nothing new> it seems the meaning is D is down only G is lifted, hit CE, ...and D is still down. What's happening to the D? – Michael Curtis Dec 30 '19 at 15:02
  • Hi there - asking for "X" on the internet is best done using a search engine. This site is for answering specific questions to resolve questions you may have. – Doktor Mayhem Dec 30 '19 at 17:55
  • 1
    Michael Curtis: You are right. Fixed. – user3555835 Dec 30 '19 at 21:14
2

The general question is: how do you play legato (strike a new note before releasing the previous note) when your hand is already doing something else, thereby limiting your choice of fingering?

There is no general answer, but rather a collection of tricks that you learn as you go through more and more advanced repertoire.

  • Successive intervals in one hand can often play (say) the top notes legato and the bottom notes slightly separated, while still sounding close enough to completely legato.

  • Sometimes you can steal a finger from the other hand if that hand isn't too busy.

  • Sometimes you give up and instead use damper pedal.

  • On a pipe organ, whose notes don't decay, you can even worm and twist around to e.g. play a legato scale with only the front and middle of one thumb.

The Chopin Etudes (Op. 10, Op. 25) are chock full of examples of this. Even if they're still beyond your technique, try slowly plunking through a few passages. A good edition of Bach fugues will also reveal insightful fingering for twisty polyphony that was composed before the damper pedal.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.