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I was wondering if there are simplified versions of the Chopin Études. I am particularly interested in Chopin Étude Op 10, No. 11 (Arpeggio Étude).

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This question is inspired by the Goldowski studies, which are basically harder versions of the Chopin Études. That's why I was wondering if there are more simplified versions.

What I mean by simplified, is for example the right hand of Op 10, No. 11 reduced to a single note melody and an easier left hand without great leaps.

The Goldowski studies of Op 10, No.11 is a left hand study, but even if you cheat and play the melody with the right hand, there are still big leaps in the left hand.

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    You should make yourself a piano reduction.: r.h. 1 voice or 2 voices (close together e,g, 3rds) and the l.h. in triads and tetrads (the lowest voice of the r.h. can be added probably also there. But it wouldn’t make a lot sense except that you have to analyze the harmony. I do so for my own accord. But what about practicing the arpeggio technic? – Albrecht Hügli Mar 26 at 19:12
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I am not aware that there are any simplified versions of that particular study but they may exist. I think I might have seen simplified versions of one or two others but I'm sorry I can't remember where (it was a long time ago).

But ask yourself: what would be the point? These pieces are intended to push the performer to do difficult things and thus improve their technique. That is the whole point; simplify them and then there is simply no point to it.

If pieces like this are beyond you at the moment then you simply need to keep working until you can manage them. Maybe that will take weeks, maybe it will take years but it could be an enjoyable journey and if you have a target (being able to play this study for example) then there is more motivation.

Good luck

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  • Good point, I understand where you're coming from. The reason why I want to play a simplified version is because it is way ahead of my level, but the essence of the piece really appeals to me so I would like to play it for fun. In terms of technique, I can manage it but it is really hard to sight read for me. Do you have tips? – Stallmp Mar 26 at 20:50
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    @Stallmp you could try and play only the top notes for the right hand, if you really want to get on to this etude. As long as you're having fun, do whatever you like with it :) – Claud H Mar 27 at 12:08
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What I mean by simplified, is for example the right hand of Op 10, No. 11 reduced to a single note melody and an easier left hand without great leaps.

So let’s have a look at measure 1:

the highest line is the melody that you can play with the r.h. The two other voices you can let drop as they are octaves of the 2 upper voices of the l.h.

The l.h. plays the bass (root note) and 5th, and by transposing the 3rd an octave lower you have the triad EbGBb of the tonic. Continuing the same way and applying this method (l.h.=135 and inversions, r.h.= melody) you can reduce easily the entire etude as you please.

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  • I see, so you basically take the lowest note of the left hand and make that the root, and then make it 1-3-5 for the left hand? – Stallmp Mar 26 at 21:46

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