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Good Evening everyone! I am trying to discover my true vocal range and have had a couple answers. I have gotten dramatic tenor, light baritone aaaand high tenor. Certainly you can't be all 3 right? I can casually sing Prince with my chest voice. And with some effort can manage a deeper rougher tone akin to a Dennis Edwards. But I am mostly around a Maxwell or Eddie kendrics sound when singing. The thing is I sing in a MUCH wider range with far more control, effort and ease in falsetto or what I assume is my falsetto and the longer I warm up singing that way, the lighter my chest voice ends up. Suffice to say its easier for me to sing Chaka Khan then Paul Williams baritone. So where do I stand? Love any help and love to connect with people

  • Why can't you be all three? What logic is there to that? As you practice more you might find more range. Most people don't fit into just one category. – ggcg Mar 27 at 11:39
  • There are people with a huge range! It's not a problem. Karen Carpenter had a range of 4 octaves! And why put yourself in a pigeon-hole? – Tim Mar 27 at 11:56
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The "true vocal range" is not "discovered" but developed. You work with and extend and ultimately tie together (or not) into a coherent instrument all aspects of your voice. Only then makes it sense to check which kind of classical vocal fach or theatric voice or individual style may be particularly and to your and a prospective's audience's satisfaction be well filled by what you might have to offer eventually.

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Based on your post I get the impression that you just sing but don't take voice lessons. If that is true I'd recommend getting a voice coach. They can help you "develop" your voice properly and extend your range. As another answer pointed out you don't discover range you develop it. With proper technique you might have half an octave more on each side of the spectrum.

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