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I got a piano piece in which in multiple occasions, it seems it suggests me to play a note with right hand, and then use left hand to press the same key and switch to left hand. How should I play these? Should I switch hand (i.e. first press with right hand, then left hand on the same key, and then leaves right hand)? Or merge it into a longer note (i.e. press with right hand, and remains on the key. left hand will just omit this note)?

For example in the 2nd attached picture, can I just omit the B on the left hand?

Is this something with the transcription and it needs adjustments? if so, how?

I have seen other similar questions, but they were same note for same start and duration, so one can just play with one hand and omit the other. But here they start one after another, with a short overlap.

Thanks in advance for your advice, pic 1 pic 2

  • The voices are not only overlapping by the hands and fingers but also by the sound! Best way: play the r.h. an octave up. If not - solution for measure 9: You could hold the B from the previous bar in the l.h. so it would sound as a harmonic when you attack the basstone B (play the latter f, then the arpeggio with a diminuendo and the upbeat mf). – Albrecht Hügli Apr 4 at 6:25
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The transcription looks OK and a pianist would easily work out how to finger it. It does need phrasing, slurs and pedal-marks though.

So I've laid it out to show which hand does what, but it's a less elegant way to do it than the original.

enter image description here

Your second phrase would be fingered like this:

enter image description here

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  • Your transcription is correct. But as you say:*less elegant* – Albrecht Hügli Apr 4 at 6:33
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Edit:

Is this something with the transcription and it needs adjustments? if so, how??

Yes, maybe this is a transcription. A simple solution would be playing the r.h. an octave up.

For example in the 2nd attached picture, can I just omit the B on the left hand?

You can, but the melody won’t be heard the same way. But if you repeat this B as written the ear might not hear what is intended. You could hold the B from the previous bar in the l.h. so it would sound as a harmonic when you attack the basstone B (play the latter f, then the arpeggio with a diminuendo and the upbeat mf).

Original answer:

Play the second voice of the right hand with the thumb. So you will stop the tone to make place for the l.h. (Value max a dotted 4th note!):

The line of the arpeggio in the accompaniment is important. A correct notation would be less clear (may be it’s written for 2 manuals on an organ):

enter image description here

Measure 9: the note B has to be shortened by both hands so that the line of two voices can be heard.

Shortly:

This set is clearly notated for a 3 part composition (2 voices r.h., arpeggio l.h.) If you have only one manual the notes and keys are conflicting. Attack the notes as written. But you can’t hold the middle voice exactly as notated. Hold them as long as possible and lift the finger right before the other voice is attacking.

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The music is written as if RH and LH are played by separate instruments. There would be no problem, of course, in one instrument sustaining the B while the other instrument played its own B. The musical intention is clear. But to achieve it on one piano keyboard requires a compromise.

No, you can't omit the second B. It needs to be heard. The compromise comes in not holding down the previous B for its full written length.

Piano composers and arrangers do this sort of thing all the time. It's not hard to play. Particularly if the sustain pedal is used, as I think it would be in this example.

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