1

Newbie player here. I've been playing piano for almost a year now (I'm 22, self taught), and have been recently trying to move up to two octave arpeggios. I'm currently struggling with a C-G-C-G-C arpeggio (up then down), I couldn't really find a fingering I was comfortable with and also be able to speed up. For reference, I am talking about the LH arpeggio from this piece (0:12 - 0:15):

(I know the tempo is pretty challenging, but I'm in no hurry)

Let me go into some details. First of all, I should say I'm not having any problems with the "usual" style of arpeggios (multiple octave triads, e.g. C-E-G-C-E-G-C). I did have a hard time with it initially but after finding some very insightful videos and spending some time to figure out the most comfortable fingering and hand movements that would work for my hands, I could work them out and after a couple weeks now are starting to feel more natural.

Secondly, it might not be important, but I should mention that I have pretty large hands. I can comfortably reach a tenth (C3-E4) over the keys and an eleventh (C3-F4) in front of the keys, no stretching involved. The downside is I also have pretty thick fingers and I used to have a hard time fitting them in-between black keys (but this has become less of a problem as I progressed). For triad arpeggios, I haven't found that this constitutes an advantage, the crossover from G to C was still pretty challenging to find a comfortable motion for.

Finally, a short walk through what I tried so far. I started off with a 5-2-1-2-1 fingering (essentially what I had practiced for triads, but skip one note). This was alright at a slow tempo, but it felt like it would be tricky to speed up, it felt a bit like "running out of fingers" when trying to play it faster. At first I thought it's just me being impatient so I kept with it for a few days but it just didn't feel right.

I decided to try a different fingering, I thought I could use the size of my hands to add another finger in there so I went with 5-3-2-1-2. This was pretty much flawed from the get-go since the 2-1-2 from C-G-C then back down again involved too much wrist movement to perform at a higher tempo comfortably.

So I am pretty much left without any options here. Or am I? I don't really know and I'm feeling pretty confused. Looking at the video more carefully (you can't see his hands, but you can see the key presses) it sort of seems like he might be using a 5-2-1-2-1 finger, judging by the break in his legato from the second C to the second G (C-G-C-G-C) but that's just a guess, I can't really tell.

I couldn't find any information online about this particular arpeggio (my google-just also needs more practice), so I came here. I think the main problem is the 2-1-2 motion that comes up in both fingering variants, is there no way to avoid that? Should I just practice more and find a way to make that more efficient? Also please let me know if I'm thinking about this all wrong, it kind of feels like I'm pushing against the grain in some ways. Thanks in advance!

0

I feel confident if you stuck with 52121 long enough, you would manage it well. Here's a rather unconventional idea that you might like to try with your large stretch: 51421.

| improve this answer | |
  • I tried the 51421: I don't think my large hands are helping, it kind of feels like crossovers are harder because of it, so that didn't work out great for me, but thanks for the suggestion! On the other hand, the 52121 is getting better, but I still feel like I'm flinging my hand around a lot. Lots of wrist movement, from side to side. Is this to be expected or am I being too over the top with my motions? – Alexandru Bracau Apr 9 at 21:29
  • You want a flexible wrist but not a huge amount of movement if you can help it. With time the arpeggio will become more fluid and legato I am sure. – Jomiddnz Apr 10 at 8:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.