-1

What are the counts/beats for this measure? Plz tell me so I can know how to do it.

4
  • 2
    You are aware, that this is just one quarter beat?
    – guidot
    Commented Apr 15, 2020 at 16:17
  • Related question concerned with counting many subpartitions.
    – guidot
    Commented Apr 15, 2020 at 16:19
  • 2
    Look at the answers for your last question, and miss out the middle note! It matters not whether it's in 2/4,3/4, 4/4, 5/4.
    – Tim
    Commented Apr 15, 2020 at 16:19
  • What instrument is it for? Why do you need to know what to do?
    – Tim
    Commented Apr 15, 2020 at 18:27

3 Answers 3

1

Where does your understanding run out in this series of rhythms? The last two are identical, except that the first note of each pair is clipped short.

(Being in 3/4 is irrelevant.)

enter image description here

1

This is exactly the same problem like in your other question:

enter image description here

How many beats/counts does this note get in 3/4 time?

In place of the eighth note in the middle you have two 16th rests corresponding to an eight note rest.

When you understood the answer of the first question you are able to realize this variation:

just let drop the two 16th counting 1 2 3 4 (whereby 2 3 are mute).

2
  • Pretty well what I said?
    – Tim
    Commented Apr 15, 2020 at 18:29
  • exactly, Tim, I should have read your comment above before. Commented Apr 15, 2020 at 18:47
0

Some counting systems have names, like Kodaly Method, which uses Ti-ri-ti-ri for sixteenth notes. That seems hard to articulate for me.

Personally, I use 1 e + a 2 e + a... spoken like one ee and uh two ee and uh. That seems common - at least in the US - but I don't think it has a name.

For rests just don't say anything.

But you left out what is actually performing the rhythm and the cropped image looks like it could be a percussion staff. If the part is not being sung, you can count all of the syllables out loud 1 e + a but only play the notated ones with your instrument. Doing both together can help you get the subdivision timing right. After you have the timing right you could count the rhythm skipping the rests, like 1 - - a where the dashes are silent but you count them mentally.

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