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First time posting on this stack exchange so if this question is better suited for somewhere else or is in need of rephrasing, please let me know and I'd be happy to fix it.

There is a particular kind of chord sequence I'm having difficulty playing on piano. I don't know what you would call this kind of movement but below is an example (from the bass clef of a piece in E Major, it so happens).

example

The specific idea is that to play the first chord (G# and E), I would need my 1st finger on the high E and my 3rd or 4th finger on the G#, and then to play the second chord (E and B), I would need my 2nd finger on the B and my 5th finger on the low E. This creates an "alternating" action between the 1st/3rd pair and the 2nd/5th pair.

Like I say, I'm having some difficulty getting this sequencing consistently right (often the 2nd finger will accidentally make its way into the 1st/3rd pair) so if anyone has any advice on how to perfect this, or even what these kinds of chords are called so that I can research them myself, it would be greatly appreciated.

EDIT: It seems this needs some clarification. I'm aware that this is the correct fingering. What I'm looking for is advice on how to make that fingering work. I'm having difficulty keeping these pairs of fingers separate when playing (1/3 and 2/5); the fast alternating motion (along with the fact that the 1st and 5th fingers usually play the same note in most contexts) means I end up playing, say, both E's together, or the high E and the B together.

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Your finger setting is ok.

What I do in similar situations is practicing the upper voice alone and the lower voice alone, this means 1212 and 4545 alone and then both voices together.

The purpose is to automate the voices respectively the finger movements. But the problem is that you have to stretch the fingers.

You can train this stretching also without the keyboard on the table or on your knees.

Start with playing slowly and augmenting the tempo.

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  • you sniped me! I was going to say the same thing. lol – cbracketdash Apr 26 at 20:45
  • Ok. I can delete it and give you a chance ;) next time I will wait some hours. – Albrecht Hügli Apr 26 at 20:59
  • no no its ok. Thank you very much though! – cbracketdash Apr 26 at 21:49
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That's a good fingering, maybe the one most would use. If you place your hand so that all four notes are covered simultaneously, you have it. It's too fast for a change of hand position, so leaving your had static, and just pressing down on appropriate fingers will do the job.

And - thanks for the info : l.h., piano and key make this easy to understand.

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