Linked Questions

26
votes
5answers
2k views

Why do we need note names like B♭, D♭ etc.? Why not use only A♯, C♯ and so on? [duplicate]

The very same sharp/flat tones can be written in two ways: C♯ is the same as D♭ D♯ is the same as E♭ …and so on This is so confusing. What is the reason for it? ...
21
votes
5answers
3k views

How to know whether to write accidentals as sharps or flats? [duplicate]

I am writing a bassline for a song in Em and there is a passing note A# or Bb in the approach notes. How do I write this note? Since the key signature has one sharp, is it best to write the accidental ...
2
votes
2answers
157 views

Question about intonation of enharmonic notes on the trumpet [duplicate]

I've been told that, ideally, a note like an e sharp or a b sharp should be slightly different in pitch from an f natural or a c natural. (especially when it is written as a leading pitch in a minor ...
48
votes
5answers
31k views

Does it really make difference to play a song in a different key?

I hear sometimes players and composers say that this song won't sound good in F Major for example, and you should play it or write it in G Major (this was just an example). In other words, it seems ...
24
votes
9answers
28k views

How to select a key-signature for a song

There are so many songs in pretty odd key-signatures like 4,5,6 sharps or flats. At least this is my impression when I listen to songs on the radio/net while trying to follow them on my piano/guitar. ...
17
votes
5answers
22k views

How to differentiate between a diminished fifth and an augmented fourth interval?

Both are a tritone appart, both sound the same. How can we differentiate when an interval is an augmented fourth or a diminished fifth? Context: In voice leading we learn that when the spelling of ...
8
votes
5answers
3k views

How do enharmonic notes affect harmony and chord progressions?

Quoting the Wikipedia article: The notes C♯ and D♭ are enharmonic (or enharmonically equivalent) notes. Namely, they are the same key on a keyboard, and thus they are identical in pitch, although ...
9
votes
4answers
2k views

If B has five sharps, and C♭ has seven flats then how can C♭ and B be the same key?

I was learning the seven-mirror rule trick online today. There was a diagram of every major key along with its corresponding number of accidentals. It was shown that the key of C♭ has seven flats. But,...
7
votes
2answers
995 views

Why Seven Principal Tones?

Why are there seven principal tones (A-G)? Just tradition? In the same vein, why are various sounds (of differing pitches) said to represent the same principal tone?
0
votes
1answer
8k views

Why do certain keys sound good together? [duplicate]

I am a DJ and the software I dj with just introduced key analyzation (Serato DJ). So now I have the key to every song in my library. Someone invented a way for DJ's to mix music in key without having ...
4
votes
2answers
602 views

What note(s) are a diminished 3rd above D-flat?

In What is the interval between Db and D# some of the comments indicate that the interval Db->Eb can be considered as a diminished third. I would think that Fbb (double-flatted F) is a diminished ...
1
vote
6answers
1k views

Confusion about intervals in chromatic VS diatonic scales

I hear terms like "fifths" and "minor thirds" and "thirds" used all the time in musical theory discussion and while I know some places I can use these terms I'm unclear if there are multiple meanings/...
1
vote
1answer
138 views

Identifying this chord (Fb Db F?)

I'm practicing identifying chords from sight reading for the first time, here is what I have so far (feel free to correct any possible mistakes I might have made). I'm struggling with that last chord ...