Questions tagged [ear-protection]

For questions about protection of the ear that can be caused by sound exposures.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
0 answers
161 views

Is it possible to design a wearable device with a noise reduction ratio (NRR) larger than 36 dB? [migrated]

Wearing both ear muffs (whether passive or active) and earplugs simultaneously can't yield more than 36 dB noise reduction ratio (NRR), because: it does not prevent the sound to reach your inner ear ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
599 views

Do I need ear protection to practice piano? [duplicate]

I once stumbled on a question on which someone suggested to consider buying ear protection for the child who was learning violin, because on the long run, playing violin can damage the child's ears. I ...
Clockwork's user avatar
  • 593
16 votes
3 answers
4k views

Why can't wearing both ear muffs (whether passive or active) and earplugs simultaneously yield more than 36 dB noise reduction ratio (NRR)?

I read on Wikipedia: Using both ear muffs (whether passive or active) and earplugs simultaneously results in maximum protection, but the efficacy of such combined protection relative to preventing ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
283 views

Why does the formula to compute the Noise Reduction Rating (NRR) subtract 3dB?

Context: NRR (Noise Reduction Rating) is the noise reduction standard used in the United States, and SNR (Single Number Rating) is the European Union's standard for showing the attenuation of hearing ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
6k views

Why do SNR ratings tend to be about 3 dB higher than NRR ratings? I.e., what difference(s) in the testing procedures account for this gap?

I read on https://eardefender.co.uk/snr-vs-nrr/ (mirror): SNR (Single Number Rating) is the EU’s standard for showing the attenuation of hearing protection. [...] NRR (Noise Reduction Rating) is the ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
2k views

How can I achieve maximum hearing protection, beyond custom-fitted earplugs + earmuffs?

I sometimes attend events with very loud music, e.g. Technoparade (> 110dB next to speakers) and at times need to stop listening the music, without having to move. How can I achieve maximum hearing ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar