Questions tagged [enharmonics]

For questions related to the different spelling of same-sounding pitches (e.g., C-sharp and D-flat).

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4
votes
2answers
175 views

Db in realization of "A7alt" in Levine's piano book

In this other question about Mark Levine's jazz piano book, there's an enharmonic spelling of b9 of G7b9 as G# instead of Ab, which some users objected to: To me that seemed completely fine, because ...
6
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5answers
153 views

Is a note that is enharmonic to a diatonic note of some diatonic scale, also diatonic in regards to that scale?

I'm learning some music theory from a book, and encountered some question in my head that I can't seem to answer. The question is in the title: Is a note that is enharmonic to a diatonic note of some ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Why does major 2nd have more harmonics than major 3rd?

I was watching this video about Just-intonation tuning system. In this video he is explaining how the harmonics work. He is explaining that the first harmonic is created by dividing a string into half,...
5
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2answers
487 views

Under what circumstances, if any, would we hear enharmomics of the perfect fourth or fifth (e.g. augmented third) in a tonal composition?

The question says it all. I'm assuming 12-tone equal temperament. To give a more familiar example, we hear a minor third and an augmented second differently, for one is a consonance and the other is a ...
6
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3answers
917 views

Can you tonicize to a chord that's not on the original key?

I had a discussion with a few people on Chopin's Nocturne in B-flat minor. We couldn't reach an agreement and I'm curious how people would analyze it. In the middle section of the piece (which is in ...
6
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4answers
923 views

Outside of Equal Temperament, what decides the spelling of notes in a major scale?

I've been reading up on the history of temperament, and how enharmonic notes are more of a limitation of the modern piano (only one black key), and also mathematically they are the same if you use ...
4
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1answer
175 views

Notation of measure 2 in Chopin's Prelude #4 in E minor

The first measure has G-B-E-B, i.e. E minor tonic chord, first inversion. Makes sense so far. Then the next measure is F♯-A-E-B followed by F♯-A-E♭-B , not so clear. According to this page the second ...
5
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7answers
1k views

Cb/B problem while creating lead sheet

I'm making a lead sheet of the song "One" by Esperanza Spalding. I chose the key of Bb because the song feels the most "at home" when the progression lands there at the guitar solo ...
6
votes
4answers
804 views

Is there any reason to use F flat in notating this blues riff (jazz)?

I am reading though Dariusz Terefenko's Jazz theory book, and in the chapter on Improvisation (chapter 10) he lists a few typical 1-, 2- and 4-bars blues riffs, all on a Bb blues scale. Several of ...
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2answers
839 views

Is it better to write music in F♯ Major or in G♭ Major?

Is it better to write music in F♯ Major or in G♭ Major? Seeing as they are enharmonic (in our 12-tone musical system), what are the advantages / disadvantages of writing in either, or should it be ...
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3answers
236 views

preference of the key of B or Cb (also G#min and Abmin)

The debate of whether F# or Gb is a better key is very prominent, but I'd like to discuss the keys of B and Cb. As a guitar player, I would much rather have the key of B to play in. As a trombonist, ...
12
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3answers
498 views

How are names of enharmonic notes determined?

In our current 12TET system, is it really incorrect to refer to E♭ as D♯ if one mentions them standalone with no reference to tonality? I understand how the notes in a diatonic scale are ...
5
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3answers
289 views

never ending omnibus progression

When I studied music theory in college (years ago), I remember my theory instructor demonstrating a use of the omnibus progression where it would go on forever, sounding continuous to the untrained ...
2
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2answers
124 views

In chord construction, in a Adim, for example, is it indifferrent to have instead of A, C, D#, have, A, C and Eb

In chord a construction, in a Adim, for example, is it indifferent to have instead of A, C, D#, have, A, C and Eb?
9
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2answers
523 views

How can I improve my violin intonation for enharmonic notes?

I know that while, for many instruments, enharmonic notes are a single pitch and their differences are more of an interpretation, helping music to remain consistent (it would make more sense for a ...
1
vote
2answers
7k views

Alto saxophone fingering for notes written below the staff

I am a beginner on the alto saxophone. I understand the fingering for playing notes on the staff but I do not understand the fingering for playing notes below the staff. Sometimes there are two extra ...
3
votes
3answers
101 views

A♭ 13 Chord Notation

A website detailing piano chords uses the following pitch notation for A-flat 13 chords: A♭13 → A♭-C-E♭-G♭-B♭-D♭-F (R, M3, P5, m7, M9, m11, m13) A♭m13 → A♭-B-E♭-G♭-C♭♭-D♭-F (R, m3, P5, m7, M9, m11, ...
3
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5answers
678 views

In harmony: key or the flow?

I play ambient music and my approach on creating chord lines is simple, just try to stick on the key and if I want to change the key then make it subtle. But today I tried to create harmony lines ...
5
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3answers
441 views

How to determine the names of the notes in any given scale

Are there any rules for naming the notes in a scale that can apply to any given scale? I know it's straightforward for diatonic. You just use each of the first 7 letters of the alphabet and [double]...
12
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8answers
1k views

Why is printed music published with incorrect enharmonics?

I'm seeing more and more music that contains conflicting or erroneous information - for example, C°7 written with an A, (not B♭♭), or E7♭5 with A♯ (not B♭). Wondering if ...
0
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4answers
1k views

Is there a benefit to writing in C# major over Db major? [duplicate]

As the title says. It seems that the really sharp keys (e.g. C#, F#, etc.) are really cumbersome to write and play in, so I was wondering if there were any advantages to them over keys like Db and Gb.
32
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7answers
9k views

Why do E♯ and F♮ not sound the same (according to Wikipedia)?

I was just reading the Wikipedia page on the note F (as I do every evening) and was confused by this part where it says that even though F♮ and E♯ are enharmonic they “do not sound the same”: E♯ is ...
5
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5answers
761 views

How to determine if an interval is enharmonic or not

I'm new to music theory, and reading through the basics I learned about interval classifications. But, along with that many questions came to my head. The one I want to ask today is the following: ...
4
votes
1answer
108 views

Why is Erik Satie's Saraband 1 in A flat major?

Why is Erik Satie's Saraband 1 in A flat major? There are so many F, C, and G flat accidentals through out the score it seem like it could have been notated in G sharp minor (enharmonic of A flat ...
2
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2answers
283 views

Identifying the roots of diminished 7th chords( depending on function)?

Diminished 7th chords are symmetric. Each one could be the same quality chord on any root note that is a chord tone inside it. So, is there agreement on which name to use for these chords? I know that ...
11
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6answers
2k views

What is the most common way to refer to a particular note in the chromatic scale without making any implications as regards tonality?

It seems to me that in current musical practice, we are often in a 12-TET situation where effectively, we have an (octave repeating) set of 12 notes that make up the chromatic scale, each of which can ...
9
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4answers
2k views

If B has five sharps, and C♭ has seven flats then how can C♭ and B be the same key?

I was learning the seven-mirror rule trick online today. There was a diagram of every major key along with its corresponding number of accidentals. It was shown that the key of C♭ has seven flats. But,...
32
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9answers
13k views

Why are C♯ and D♭ different frequencies?

I am a music enthusiast, and I was recently reading What is the difference between equivalent Flat and Sharp keys as far as musical notation? Are there any reasons to prefer one over the other? This ...
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3answers
835 views

Why are there different names for the same interval? [duplicate]

The intervals F-B and B-F are called Augmented Fourth and Diminished Fifth respectively, but they are really both the same interval - a tritone. Why are they named differently?
5
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3answers
4k views

Why use the key of C#?

I was reading about Brahms, and it was mentioned that he had composed a piece in C# Major. AFAIK, we generally don't use C# Major in jazz or rock music because the key signature has 7 sharps, so it'...
65
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5answers
14k views

What's the difference between a G♭ and an F#?

I've heard it said that, whilst on most instruments these notes are played with the same fingerings/technique/etc., there is a subtle difference. This isn't specific to this particular note ...