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Questions tagged [hearing]

Coherent distinguishing of aural sensations. See also "ear-training"

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Sometimes I naturally sing songs in the right key. Do I have perfect (absolute) pitch?

Sometimes I'll be singing a song, and then I'll play a recording and discover I was singing in the same key. Does this mean I have perfect pitch?
Aaron's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
2k views

Do I have perfect pitch

I noticed that when a certain note is played I can immediately attach to it songs that begin with that note. I was wondering if: 1 - I have the potential for perfect pitch 2 - Is there a way to check ...
Amit's user avatar
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8 answers
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How to develop a musical ear when even singing poses great difficulty?

I love music and would love to develop a musical ear. My problem is that I can't get started. All tutorials that I find start at a more advanced point compared to where I am at. I can't carry a tune. ...
Wynne's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
23k views

Do I have perfect pitch?

I only meet some of the criteria of perfect pitch. Whenever I hear a note, I can name a song or piece starting with it. I also remember the right key of music I hear, and, when I try to play it on ...
R.fineman's user avatar
23 votes
8 answers
11k views

Do ear plugs have a big effect on ability to hear the music?

Ear plugs are likely a good idea for anybody performing amplified music (or even enjoying amplified music). But what is the effect on the ability to hear your fellow musicians when playing in a ...
Ryan Kinal's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
1k views

How can we sing in tune, given a perfect ear for music, if we always hear ourselves lower than we actually sound?

According to this BBC article, we hear ourselves bassy compared to how we sound to others. What makes a recording of our voice sound so different... and awful? It’s because when you speak you hear ...
V-R's user avatar
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5 votes
5 answers
342 views

Does our hearing generate neural signals for harmonics?

First off, the (unrolled) length of our cochlea maps out frequencies such that high frequency sounds cause excitation (neural signals) from the front part of the cochlea, and low frequencies result in ...
Dave's user avatar
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30 votes
3 answers
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Why does music seem to transpose when I yawn?

You might have experienced this a few times : when you listen to music and yawn, what you hear seems to transpose slightly. Why does this happen? I'm thinking it could be the tension of the eardrum ...
user13550's user avatar
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16 votes
3 answers
4k views

Why can't wearing both ear muffs (whether passive or active) and earplugs simultaneously yield more than 36 dB noise reduction ratio (NRR)?

I read on Wikipedia: Using both ear muffs (whether passive or active) and earplugs simultaneously results in maximum protection, but the efficacy of such combined protection relative to preventing ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
3k views

Am I the only one to hear Cb instead of B here?

This comes from BWV 847 (the C minor fugue from the Well Tempered Clavier). Look at the third beat from measure 28. I can't help but hear an A flat minor chord here, that is Eb, Cb, Ab. Especially ...
Alexandre C.'s user avatar
7 votes
5 answers
6k views

Are the highest pitches always the easiest to hear in a musical texture?

Are the highest pitches always the easiest to hear in a musical texture (all other factors, such as dynamic, timbre, articulation, etc. being equal)? Is this why melodic parts tend to be the highest ...
Bob Broadley's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
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How can I achieve maximum hearing protection, beyond custom-fitted earplugs + earmuffs?

I sometimes attend events with very loud music, e.g. Technoparade (> 110dB next to speakers) and at times need to stop listening the music, without having to move. How can I achieve maximum hearing ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
5k views

If the resolution of human hearing is approximately five cents, how can musicians play works with intonation changes of less than five cents?

Sources1 suggest that the frequency resolution of humans—our ability to discriminate differences in pitch—is limited to around five cents. If this is the case, how can musicians play an excerpt like ...
Richard's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
2k views

Does perfect (absolute) pitch ever go out of tune?

When someone has perfect pitch, can it get "out of tune"? I've heard of musicians who had perfect pitch but as they got older they didn't have perfect pitch any more, or maybe it just got &...
Aaron's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
965 views

Most useful piano exercises to memorize for playing by ear?

I'm not talented at all but I consider myself very dedicated and with a good ability to learn and memorize new material through my hands (not ears) I'm playing the piano on my own for 2 years, ...
Dragolis's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
6k views

Why do SNR ratings tend to be about 3 dB higher than NRR ratings? I.e., what difference(s) in the testing procedures account for this gap?

I read on https://eardefender.co.uk/snr-vs-nrr/ (mirror): SNR (Single Number Rating) is the EU’s standard for showing the attenuation of hearing protection. [...] NRR (Noise Reduction Rating) is the ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
4k views

Improve bad ear

My musical ear is terrible. It is so bad that I don't think any amount of training can get me to a reasonable level (I've tried). Is there a way that I could improve it dramatically? I am open to any ...
DevShark's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
1k views

I have semi (explained) perfect pitch but can't handle harmonic intervals. What do I practice?

As the title suggests I have a form of perfect pitch that is not exactly perfect pitch. So let's say I hear a melody. I can name the notes as I hear them if they're not insanely fast of course. The ...
Not Amused's user avatar