Questions tagged [terminology]

For questions about musical terms. Questions about symbols should use the "notation" tag.

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5
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1answer
72 views

What is meant by syllable “ES” in solfege? Possibly only in Turkish?

Sorry, half language, half music question In this Bağlama video the author seems to refer to a note by name "ES". Here is the transcript taken from a comment by author: <!-- language-all: ...
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1answer
58 views

Simile Mark on sheet music [closed]

On the sheet music I am playing, I have faced 3 simile Mark each on different bar continuously. Does it mean I should repeat 3 measures back ?
5
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3answers
352 views

What is the name of this rhythm? (embedded 4:3 polyrhythm)

What's the name of this rhythm? There's an embedded 4:3 polyrhythm, where the two voices will arrive together on beats 1 and 4 of each bar. It reminds me of a clave (2:3), but it's not.
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4answers
130 views

What kind of non-chord tone dissonance is this?

What is the correct term for this type of non-chord tone? I really like the sound of it and since I see it a lot I was wondering if an "official" name exists for it. It is not a suspension ...
2
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1answer
57 views

Is there a musical term for melodic density?

Is there a musical term for melodic density? By density i simply mean the amount of melodic (as opposed to harmonic) notes within a given time measure. Example: 40 notes within a bar has higher ...
5
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1answer
148 views

What are these overlapping notes with different rhythms called in Music Theory?

On piano, when playing a long note followed by an overlapping shorter note or vice versa, what is this called? I know this is an extremely common thing in piano music, but I don't know what it's ...
0
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1answer
59 views

If I am going to dabble in the world of music, what aspect should I train more to build a solid base, and thus obtain better results(?) [closed]

Good morning, I think I summarized it pretty well in the question, however, I mean exactly that "push" that a beginner must have, something that avoids excessive stumbles in their learning, ...
2
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2answers
67 views

Is there a term or phrase to describe a tune that always stays in the same key but shifts modes throughout?

Teaching myself modes, I'm writing a short piece for string quartet that always holds to the same key, but starts out in locrian and ends in lydian, going through all the modes, brightening up and ...
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3answers
116 views

What's it called when you play the same exact melody with a different rhythm?

As an example, here is the original iconic melodic phrase that's used throughout the Trails Sky games: https://youtube.com/embed/3GB-xej4GFc?start=66&end=85 But here in this next piece, the exact ...
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1answer
385 views

What is the difference between “primi toni” and “octavi toni”

In XVI century, there was a composer called Girolamo Cavazzoni. He wrote (amongst other pieces) a couple of Magnificats - in primi toni, quarti toni, sexti toni and octavi toni. You can find the sheet ...
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3answers
95 views

Electronic music and layering of rhythms

A very common (indeed ubiquitous) technique in electronic music involves the layering of loops of different lengths on top of each other. Consider the following DnB track: https://www.beatport.com/...
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6answers
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Black keys - what scale are these, how to use them?

I'm a beginning music theory student and often when I'm supposed to be doing exercises I get distracted and start doodling around for fun on the black keys. It's easy to compose simple, satisfying ...
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2answers
288 views

Scales changes in Orchestration

There is a common technic used in orchestration across all genres of music. Sometimes in the second verse or before the singer is about to repeat another part in the song there is a move usually up in ...
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1answer
60 views

Is there a name for “singing between registers”, as if one as at the end of their range, to produce multiple notes?

I've been experimenting with singing a note and then slowly devoicing it or applying less pressure with my, usually near the top of my chest / modal(?) register, and trying to get that harsh sound ...
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3answers
860 views

What do you call a very brief change of key

When the key changes for a longer period and a new tonic is firmly established, we call it modulation. However, what do we call a very brief change of at most several measures, when harmony from ...
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2answers
480 views

How would you describe this not-quite-a-triplet rhythm? [duplicate]

Sounds like a triplet but not quite since it's not all even. Is there a name for this?
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2answers
59 views

How to balance my phrase structure? [closed]

I'm trying to compose a verse (with refrain?)-chorus (bridge?) pop song (optional: Instrumental intro, bridge before the final chorus, instrumental solo somewhere) about 3-4 minutes in length. I've ...
7
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1answer
376 views

What is this “CC” (double common-time) time signature called?

From Brahms Fugue in A-flat minor, WoO 8: The file name is "Double Common Time" JPEG but only because that's the only thing I can figure out to call it. Bonus question: Can this time ...
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0answers
208 views

What does this music CAPTCHA mean? [closed]

Select all images where if you were to add a decrescendo it would add to the musicality of the piece without being interpreted as an overly heavy-handed metaphor within the context of the thematic ...
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2answers
70 views

In Hindemith's terms, how do I classify this melodic gesture?

I am attempting to analyze the G note in the melody pictured below using Paul Hindemith's terminology/framework set out in his Book 2. From what I can gather, the melodic formulae Hindemith is ...
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2answers
218 views

What is the relation of proportional schemes and the “golden section” to melody?

...And how is this reduction meant to be read? Taken from p. 66 of David Neumeyer's The Music of Paul Hindemith This is the beginning of the section on analyzing melodies, and it totally blindsided ...
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4answers
246 views

What is this embellishment called?

There's a technique I've seen used a lot in jazz, gospel, pop singing, etc. where someone will play a note and play a quick semitone up and back down into another note. Heres an audio example. Does ...
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1answer
34 views

What is the difference between “32 bar form”, “song form”, and “ternary” with a repeated first section?

There are separate wikipedia articles for 32 bar form, but song form and ternary are in one article. From my understanding, repeats do not change the form in terms of classification, which is ...
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4answers
137 views

Accidentals - what's that?

We are aware that an accidental is a sign which changes the pitch of a note usually stated in the key signature, like a natural sign before a C in key D makes that into C♮, etc. Sometimes even the key ...
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1answer
127 views

Is there a name for music where only the bass instruments are used

I just love the bass, there are youtube channels with bass players that just do bass solo. Is there a name for this. I can't find anything on spotify that resembles for example this:
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1answer
69 views

Is there a word or music term for when a singer is mimicing the instrument, like at the beginning of the song Dang Me by Roger Miller? [duplicate]

Title is self-explanatory. I'm asking if there is a word or musical term for when a singer is mimicking the sound of the instrument that's playing. An example of what I'm asking for is at the very ...
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2answers
118 views

Name for this common rhythm in Latin music?

This rhythm is one or two set of triplets (maybe it can go up to 3 but I don't think I have heard 3 before) that I see appear fairly frequently in Latin music. Example is at 1:34 in María by Ricky ...
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8answers
4k views

Is there a broader term for instruments, like the gong, whose volume briefly increases after being sounded instead of immediately decaying?

For most instruments, their sound immediately begins to decay after they first sound. When you strike a piano key, for instance, the loudest sound is at the very beginning, after which the sound ...
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1answer
89 views

Is there literal correlation between sounds and the words to describe them?

In English, we describe pitches as "high" and "low", as being "sharp" or "flat". A timbre can be "fat". At least one study suggests that there is a ...
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4answers
2k views

What is it called when different instruments play the same phrase one after another without overlap?

I was wondering if there was a name for when different instruments play the same phrase in succession without overlapping, like in the outro of Moose the Mooche by Charlie Parker.
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2answers
422 views

How do you define Harmonic Retrogression with regard to intensity?

I was doing some practice problems in the AP Barron's Music Theory book, and one of the practice problems asks: “When harmonies within a phrase move from a strong intensity to a less strong intensity [...
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2answers
120 views

Is there terminology for vocals that do not use lyrics in certain parts? [duplicate]

Is there terminology for the below type of vocals, without words, where it almost sounds like the singer functions even more like an instrument rather than singing lyrics, if that makes sense? The ...
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1answer
105 views

What is it called when there is a slow point/pause in the middle of a song, before returning to normal speed and intensity?

In modern music such as as pop, rock and even dance music, there are times when the music builds to a certain high point (may not necessarily be the most intense point, but fairly intense) and then ...
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1answer
53 views

Why is there a m3 in diminished triads and diminished sevenths? [duplicate]

In a diminished triad, the diminished interval is 1>5. In a full diminished seventh chord, the 1>7 is also diminished. In a half-diminished chord, the 1>5 is diminished.(But one third of it ...
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5answers
951 views

Properly counting notes from sheet music

I'm beginner piano player. I'm trying to play easy song from notes like below: In whole song I'm counting notes: 1 2 3 4. Because I can see that the shortest note is 1/4. But there is an exception in ...
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0answers
93 views

Why do some songs change while fading out? What is it called?

I noticed that some songs repeat a theme and then fade out at the end, but before completely fading out the song "changes". For example, the singer sings different words (that don't appear ...
4
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2answers
138 views

Is there a name for the repetition of lyrics in music by a person or group of persons?

In the song BrokEn by Coldplay there are lyrics sung by the lead singer that are repeated by a background choir; Lord, when I'm broken (when I'm broken) I'm in need (I'm in need) I feel that ocean (...
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2answers
210 views

Confusion about Zarlino and his assertions about the diatessaron (perfect fourth)

In Part Three of Gioseffo Zarlino's "Le Istitutioni Harmoniche", "The Art of Counterpoint", Zarlino argues that the diatessaron (or perfect fourth) is not a dissonance, as the ...
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1answer
61 views

Is there a vocal technique used here? If so, what is it called?

(0:53) I'm looking at this song "Just Hold Me" by Maria Mena which I found to be a very good song in terms of the vocals. Though I'm curious, is there actually a specific vocal technique for ...
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1answer
73 views

What is the difference between melisma and lick?

Teacher always told me there's a difference but I still don't understand the difference. The textbook says "Melisma and lick have the same meaning but are appropriate to different styles of music&...
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1answer
73 views

What is a term for an instrument that can play any note, even the notes between notes? [duplicate]

A piano has only so many notes. You can't really play notes between those notes. Some Indian instruments can play even more notes between those on a piano, I believe called "microtones". ...
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3answers
347 views

Latin voice denotations in Renaissance vocal music

I see that in the original printings of renaissance vocal music, the voices are labeled with Latin words like cantus, triplex, medius, etc... Assuming that these words denote the ranges of their ...
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2answers
687 views

What is the difference between the bridge, the pre-chorus, and the middle 8?

For years, I have been understanding the bridge as the part leading into the last chorus, and pre-chorus as the part leading into the choruses before last. But recently I found out my understanding ...
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1answer
499 views

What is the origin and original meaning of “tonic”, “supertonic”, “mediant”, etc.?

Each of the pitches in the diatonic scale has a "name": tonic supertonic mediant subdominant dominant submediant subtonic I was first introduced to tonic, dominant, and subdominant in the ...
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1answer
423 views

Meaning of KV 311 in 'Sonata No. 8 D major, KV 311'

I have come across Mozart's composition: 'Sonata No. 8 D major, KV 311' What is the meaning of KV 311 in the name :'Sonata No. 8 D major, KV 311'.
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3answers
730 views

Do the instruments used in a piece of music play a role in determining its genre?

I am researching about music genres but I am confused if instruments played in music help in determining its genre? What could be the differentiating features in genre recognition of music?
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2answers
133 views

Which chords can be played simultaneously? [closed]

For example, my instrumental's chord progression = Dm, F, C, Bb Which chords can be played at the same time as Dm and C and still sound "good"? Is there some sort of terminology for chords ...
3
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2answers
208 views

(How) Do the terms “open” and “close” position apply to chords with multiple doublings?

Based on Open/Close Position Chords: What I am missing? a simple triad (no doubling) is in "close position" if the chord tones are packed as closely together as possible, and in a four-...
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4answers
147 views

Is there a term for the combination of melody and harmony, excluding percussion?

I am working with a simple sound generator, which can simultaneously produce multiple sine waves plus white noise. The sine waves can have their frequency and volume modified over time, and the white ...
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8answers
1k views

Secondary Dominants - is there a more appropriate term?

An example - in key C major, the E7 chord is a 'secondary dominant' chord. Now, if it goes directly to the chord it's dominant to in its own right - A, or Am, then it makes sense to call it secondary ...

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