Questions tagged [terminology]

For questions about musical terms. Questions about symbols should use the "notation" tag.

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3
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4answers
232 views

What is this embellishment called?

There's a technique I've seen used a lot in jazz, gospel, pop singing, etc. where someone will play a note and play a quick semitone up and back down into another note. Heres an audio example. Does ...
2
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1answer
27 views

What is the difference between “32 bar form”, “song form”, and “ternary” with a repeated first section?

There are separate wikipedia articles for 32 bar form, but song form and ternary are in one article. From my understanding, repeats do not change the form in terms of classification, which is ...
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4answers
131 views

Accidentals - what's that?

We are aware that an accidental is a sign which changes the pitch of a note usually stated in the key signature, like a natural sign before a C in key D makes that into C♮, etc. Sometimes even the key ...
3
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1answer
116 views

Is there a name for music where only the bass instruments are used

I just love the bass, there are youtube channels with bass players that just do bass solo. Is there a name for this. I can't find anything on spotify that resembles for example this:
2
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1answer
66 views

Is there a word or music term for when a singer is mimicing the instrument, like at the beginning of the song Dang Me by Roger Miller? [duplicate]

Title is self-explanatory. I'm asking if there is a word or musical term for when a singer is mimicking the sound of the instrument that's playing. An example of what I'm asking for is at the very ...
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2answers
93 views

Name for this common rhythm in Latin music?

This rhythm is one or two set of triplets (maybe it can go up to 3 but I don't think I have heard 3 before) that I see appear fairly frequently in Latin music. Example is at 1:34 in María by Ricky ...
35
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8answers
4k views

Is there a broader term for instruments, like the gong, whose volume briefly increases after being sounded instead of immediately decaying?

For most instruments, their sound immediately begins to decay after they first sound. When you strike a piano key, for instance, the loudest sound is at the very beginning, after which the sound ...
3
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1answer
88 views

Is there literal correlation between sounds and the words to describe them?

In English, we describe pitches as "high" and "low", as being "sharp" or "flat". A timbre can be "fat". At least one study suggests that there is a ...
7
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4answers
2k views

What is it called when different instruments play the same phrase one after another without overlap?

I was wondering if there was a name for when different instruments play the same phrase in succession without overlapping, like in the outro of Moose the Mooche by Charlie Parker.
5
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2answers
343 views

How do you define Harmonic Retrogression with regard to intensity?

I was doing some practice problems in the AP Barron's Music Theory book, and one of the practice problems asks: “When harmonies within a phrase move from a strong intensity to a less strong intensity [...
2
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2answers
104 views

Is there terminology for vocals that do not use lyrics in certain parts? [duplicate]

Is there terminology for the below type of vocals, without words, where it almost sounds like the singer functions even more like an instrument rather than singing lyrics, if that makes sense? The ...
2
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1answer
98 views

What is it called when there is a slow point/pause in the middle of a song, before returning to normal speed and intensity?

In modern music such as as pop, rock and even dance music, there are times when the music builds to a certain high point (may not necessarily be the most intense point, but fairly intense) and then ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Why is there a m3 in diminished triads and diminished sevenths? [duplicate]

In a diminished triad, the diminished interval is 1>5. In a full diminished seventh chord, the 1>7 is also diminished. In a half-diminished chord, the 1>5 is diminished.(But one third of it ...
4
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5answers
936 views

Properly counting notes from sheet music

I'm beginner piano player. I'm trying to play easy song from notes like below: In whole song I'm counting notes: 1 2 3 4. Because I can see that the shortest note is 1/4. But there is an exception in ...
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0answers
88 views

Why do some songs change while fading out? What is it called?

I noticed that some songs repeat a theme and then fade out at the end, but before completely fading out the song "changes". For example, the singer sings different words (that don't appear ...
3
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1answer
109 views

Is there a name for the repetition of lyrics in music by a person or group of persons?

In the song BrokEn by Coldplay there are lyrics sung by the lead singer that are repeated by a background choir; Lord, when I'm broken (when I'm broken) I'm in need (I'm in need) I feel that ocean (...
7
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2answers
204 views

Confusion about Zarlino and his assertions about the diatessaron (perfect fourth)

In Part Three of Gioseffo Zarlino's "Le Istitutioni Harmoniche", "The Art of Counterpoint", Zarlino argues that the diatessaron (or perfect fourth) is not a dissonance, as the ...
0
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1answer
60 views

Is there a vocal technique used here? If so, what is it called?

(0:53) I'm looking at this song "Just Hold Me" by Maria Mena which I found to be a very good song in terms of the vocals. Though I'm curious, is there actually a specific vocal technique for ...
3
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1answer
69 views

What is the difference between melisma and lick?

Teacher always told me there's a difference but I still don't understand the difference. The textbook says "Melisma and lick have the same meaning but are appropriate to different styles of music&...
1
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1answer
59 views

What is a term for an instrument that can play any note, even the notes between notes? [duplicate]

A piano has only so many notes. You can't really play notes between those notes. Some Indian instruments can play even more notes between those on a piano, I believe called "microtones". ...
7
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3answers
313 views

Latin voice denotations in Renaissance vocal music

I see that in the original printings of renaissance vocal music, the voices are labeled with Latin words like cantus, triplex, medius, etc... Assuming that these words denote the ranges of their ...
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2answers
264 views

What is the difference between the bridge, the pre-chorus, and the middle 8?

For years, I have been understanding the bridge as the part leading into the last chorus, and pre-chorus as the part leading into the choruses before last. But recently I found out my understanding ...
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1answer
459 views

What is the origin and original meaning of “tonic”, “supertonic”, “mediant”, etc.?

Each of the pitches in the diatonic scale has a "name": tonic supertonic mediant subdominant dominant submediant subtonic I was first introduced to tonic, dominant, and subdominant in the ...
7
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1answer
416 views

Meaning of KV 311 in 'Sonata No. 8 D major, KV 311'

I have come across Mozart's composition: 'Sonata No. 8 D major, KV 311' What is the meaning of KV 311 in the name :'Sonata No. 8 D major, KV 311'.
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3answers
702 views

Do the instruments used in a piece of music play a role in determining its genre?

I am researching about music genres but I am confused if instruments played in music help in determining its genre? What could be the differentiating features in genre recognition of music?
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2answers
119 views

Which chords can be played simultaneously? [closed]

For example, my instrumental's chord progression = Dm, F, C, Bb Which chords can be played at the same time as Dm and C and still sound "good"? Is there some sort of terminology for chords ...
3
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2answers
198 views

(How) Do the terms “open” and “close” position apply to chords with multiple doublings?

Based on Open/Close Position Chords: What I am missing? a simple triad (no doubling) is in "close position" if the chord tones are packed as closely together as possible, and in a four-...
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4answers
142 views

Is there a term for the combination of melody and harmony, excluding percussion?

I am working with a simple sound generator, which can simultaneously produce multiple sine waves plus white noise. The sine waves can have their frequency and volume modified over time, and the white ...
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8answers
1k views

Secondary Dominants - is there a more appropriate term?

An example - in key C major, the E7 chord is a 'secondary dominant' chord. Now, if it goes directly to the chord it's dominant to in its own right - A, or Am, then it makes sense to call it secondary ...
3
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2answers
109 views

General term to cover piano fingerings, trombone slide positions, Theremin hand positions, etc

Is there a general term to describe the concepts referred by "fingering", "(slide) position", perhaps other such words, that describe the specific manipulations of an instrument to ...
3
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3answers
121 views

What is the correct terminology/notation for playing notes in a chord at the same time, and not as an arpeggio?

It is very common for interpreters of sheet music — especially string players — to roll chords. What is the notation to specify that all notes should sound at once? I had thought it was a square ...
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3answers
212 views

Just how specific is the term “hemiola”?

In Name and structure of staggering beat in Ramones' “Merry Christmas,” the rhythm in the second measure of the following example is described as a hemiola: But to me, these are just triplets and not ...
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4answers
579 views

Is 7/8 an example of measured rhythm or metrical rhythm?

Wikipedia provides the following definitions: Metrical rhythm, by far the most common class in Western music, is where each time value is a multiple or fraction of a fixed unit (beat, see paragraph ...
5
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2answers
87 views

Name and structure of staggering beat in Ramones' “Merry Christmas”

Towards the end of The Ramones' "Merry Christmas (I Don't Want to Fight)", the beat takes on a staggering quality when Joey sings "don't want to" in the chorus. In the following ...
0
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3answers
55 views

What is the term for a machine that helps record and layer tunes?

GarageBand is a software that lets users record music, e.g. from a piano, then play it back, and record an added layer, e.g. guitar, then play the two together, adding more layers, e.g. drums. And ...
7
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4answers
154 views

Names of different definitions of key

If we read the Wikipedia page for musical key, or the question about the Definition of minor key, we might notice conflicting views regarding the definition of "key". On one hand, we have a ...
3
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1answer
60 views

Dissonance from the decay of fast notes is called what?

If an instrument with slow decay plays a fast melody, dissonance from the last note and the decay of the previous note can easily produce dissonance. Is there a technical term for this specific kind ...
3
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3answers
177 views

Is there a name for this kind of guitar chord - not open, no barre, strings dampened?

It's so convenient to say "open chord..." or "barre chord..." but then there are chords like these... ...where they are not open, not barred, and importantly require dampening ...
6
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1answer
357 views

What are brass instrument “pedal tones” and “false tones”, and how are they different?

The below two questions resulted in some debate, confusion, and consternation: What are the acoustics of brass instrument pedal tones? What are brass instrument “false notes” and how are they played? ...
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1answer
109 views

What are brass instrument “false notes” and how are they played?

In @AlbrechtHügli's answer to Properties of a very low pitched natural horn?, "false notes" are mentioned. What are they, and how are they produced?
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2answers
38 views

Which tempo indications have changed meaning over time, and how so?

I recall a piano teacher once telling me that the tempo marking in a piece I was learning (andante, if memory serves) meant different things in different eras. (Maybe slower in the Baroque than in the ...
4
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2answers
1k views

What is this five-note, repeating bass pattern called?

I'm looking for examples of this repeating pattern as a bass. Not these specific notes, but what is it called when you have five notes played quickly and many times?
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6answers
391 views

Why is 3/4 called “simple triple” if we can divided the beats by more than 2?

As I understand it, the terms duple, triple, quadruple, etc refer to the number of beats in the measure. So if my measure is divided into 3 beats, then I'd be in triple meter. For example, X: 1 M: 3/4 ...
4
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1answer
100 views

Why are there chords that aren't a third away form the root considered chromatic mediants?

For example, take a C chord. One of the requirements for a chord to be a chromatic mediant is that it is a major/minor third away from the root. So why are chords like Cm, Fm, C♯ and F♯ considered ...
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2answers
139 views

'Extended Secondary Dominant Chords'?

Was asked about secondary dominants recently. Also about secondary extended dominants. From a bit of research, it seems there are two views on what the latter are. Could be extended (dominant) chords -...
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2answers
978 views

Why does “Modern Man” from “The Suburbs (2010)” have missing beats?

I used to feel "Modern Man" from "The Suburbs (2010)" by Arcade Fire had an interesting "beat skip effect". But now when I really count the beat, there are indeed missing ...
6
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1answer
684 views

What is the terminology for these two techniques on piano?

Disclaimer: I don't know music terminology, as I don't play any instruments. The channel Sheet Music Boss on YouTube has two videos in which I've heard what I perceive to be two different techniques ...
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2answers
153 views

What do they call it when rock singers flatten out a well known folk song?

What I'm talking about is what Bruce Springsteen does to the classic song "Santa Claus is Coming to Town". His version of the song doesn't have the same melody as the original. Instead it ...
2
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2answers
805 views

Term for reverse engineering a song

Like most musicians, sometimes I sit down and listen to a song, and attempt to "reverse engineer" what the notes and chords and so on might be. Is there a widely understood term for that?
3
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1answer
138 views

What is this thing that they do in Cosi fan tutti?

I hear some people talk about singing as something that is extremely connected to speech. Some even say that we must first begin with the speaking voice before we start to sing. I did an interesting ...

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