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For general questions about chords like how to play them, construct them, or what symbols represent them. For more in depth analysis of the ideas behind chords themselves, please use the chord-theory tag.

6
votes
In the major scale, the first and fourth degrees are major. The fifth degree is dominant (major 3rd but minor 7th). The second, third and sixth degrees are minor, and the seventh degree is a minor wit …
answered Sep 30 '13 by Chochos
1
vote
The short answer: No. Long answer: Your method is valid for major and minor chords, but there are other chords. For example the 7th degree of the major scale, using your notation, is {0,3,6 …
answered Oct 22 '13 by Chochos
0
votes
If you play the same barre, you could just use a capo...
answered May 31 '13 by Chochos
2
votes
But the C7 (or any 7 chord) is based off of the major scale. It's the V degree of the major scale. So for C major, the V is G7. This is because the V is the only degree that has a major 3rd but a mino …
answered Aug 20 '14 by Chochos
0
votes
Including the 7th in the chord (or playing it instead of the 5th) lets you hear a clear difference in the dominant chord (major 3rd, minor 7th). In the V-I chord progressions it's particularly useful …
answered Feb 17 '14 by Chochos
3
votes
You can press strings 4,5 and 6 with finger 1, and mute strings 1,2 and 3 with finger 3 or finger 4 (about 2 frets up from finger 1)
answered May 28 '13 by Chochos
3
votes
progression (the original one), if we once again turn Am7 into A7 because it's the V degree of D, then the II degree of D would be Em7, so we can squeeze Em7 before A7 and play those 2 chords in the …
answered Jul 15 '14 by Chochos