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For questions about sequences of chords, and the relationship of one chord to the next. Typically questions about chord progressions should also be tagged harmony if asking about in depth concepts about them. Questions that are about abstractions of chord progressions use Roman Numeral analysis should also be tagged with Roman-Numeral and analysis if applicable.

3
votes
It's a common progression in classical harmony if the middle chords are in first inversion. One has C,B,Bb,A as a bass line with chords above, C,G6,Bb6,a (with appropriate sevenths if wanted). It's a …
answered May 4 by ttw
1
vote
Basically, you can do almost anything you want. Two ideas come to mind (mostly from a classical POV), one is to substitute the last iv with a VI (Bb in your case) and the other is to substitute the la …
answered Mar 17 '18 by ttw
8
votes
It's not particularly rare in classical music. It's there called (by theory)a "chromatic mediant." The voice leading is smooth; one possibility would A->A, C#->C, and E->F. Of course, the progression …
answered Aug 10 '16 by ttw
5
votes
I would argue that there is little acoustical science behind whether a chord progression is pleasant or not. Two other considerations may easily overpower what acoustical effects exist. One is just cu …
answered Apr 21 '17 by ttw
1
vote
It's not common. I have seen ii7 to I63 to ii65 to V. Returning to I63 would make the tonic a neighbor chord which doesn't cause problems. The ii7 to I63 to ii65 makes the tonic a passing chord. No pr …
answered Nov 10 '18 by ttw
0
votes
Lots of practice. One doesn't always get things right. It's tough to tell a ii6 from a IV. One can also use a knowledge of "usual" chord changes for a given genre. (Works for Baroque through Jazz an …
answered Mar 14 by ttw
1
vote
In (CPP) music theory, the ii-V-I sequence often occurs with the ii replaced by a II or a II7 or a ii6 (and the V can become a V7). I'm guessing that similar modifications occur in pop music. Mostly i …
answered Dec 11 '17 by ttw
1
vote
There's another popular sequence that has been used from the 1700s until the present: I7-IV-ii65-V7 (with various other inversions possible.) One can get a nice progression of AABA' using I-vi-ii-V, I …
answered Jul 4 '17 by ttw
2
votes
Not really as suggested by modern theorists. The (clock) time is too short. To establiah a new key, one usually must use noted that were not in the previous key. One can use non-tonic chords in any ke …
answered Apr 12 by ttw
1
vote
In Common Practice Period theory, the minor dominant (AKA minor chord on scale step 5) is rather common. It's used when harmony based on step 5 is wanted but without the cadential implications of the …
answered Jan 1 by ttw
3
votes
With a bit of practice, you will be able to think both ways at the same time. I tend to think C,F,Am,G when playing and I,IV,vi,V when composing. A bit of both when improvising. The Roman Numeral (or …
answered Sep 21 '18 by ttw
2
votes
The Dm-A7-D is good but a bit of elaboration helps. One good method is to set up the expectation of a minor chord with: dm-X-e06-A7-dm dm-X-e06-A7-dm dm-X-e06-A7-D Another technique is to just go dm …
answered Aug 12 '18 by ttw
1
vote
It's a cycle of fifths (or fourth if you want to look at it this way). It is a chain of chords with roots a fifth apart. The whole thing and parts of it are commonly used. The presence of the flats do …
answered Feb 15 by ttw
0
votes
Another analysis of Cm7 - Eb7 - D7 - Ab7 - G7 would be: i - G7/V/V - V7/V - G7 - V7 or a German Sixth of V7/V then V7/V followed by the German Sixth (in C-minor) then V7. It's sort of a i-V7 sequenc …
answered Mar 3 '17 by ttw
0
votes
There are lots of popular and classical pieces which use the following chord progressions. These pieces often share nothing but the chord progressions. I,V,V,I I,vi,ii,V I,IV,vii0,iii,vi,ii,V I,bVII, …
answered Jun 28 '18 by ttw

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