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For questions about guitar playing in general. For questions specifically about electric guitars, see "electric-guitar". For questions specifically about acoustic guitars with or without pickup systems, see "acoustic-guitar".

3
votes
There is a technique from Ted Greene Chord Chemistry book (acknowledged to George van Eps) to fret to adjacent strings on the same fret with one finger. Although this isn't barre (You should use tip o …
answered Aug 30 '11 by Hubert Czerski
5
votes
This site is gona do it for You: http://chordfind.com/ Here You can browse by chord type and see chord shape on fretboard, or enter the fret numebers or x - and find a chord name. This is a basic t …
answered Sep 17 '11 by Hubert Czerski
2
votes
I Use Sibelius G7. Tremolos are located on third pane of Keypad. Press CTRL+ALT+K (or menu Windows->Keypad) to display Keypad window, and then "+" key on numeric keyboard (or just use Your mouse t …
answered Sep 25 '11 by Hubert Czerski
13
votes
Scales are the foundation to building the chords. Each scale, whether it be major, minor, dominant, Lydian Dominant, Harmonic minor, pentatonic and on, enables you to construct different set of chords …
answered Oct 24 '11 by Hubert Czerski
12
votes
F#m7b5 -> B7 -> Em7 is ii-V-I minor progression in key of E-minor then Em7 -> A7 can be thought as ii-V7 in Dmajor or Em7 -> A7 -> Dm7 as D minor ii-V7-I Dm7 -> G7 -> Cmaj7 is normal ii-V7-I in k …
answered Sep 21 '11 by Hubert Czerski
1
vote
, different materials - bone, wood) I myself use: 1.14 plastic pick with oval endings parallel on .12 gauge strings for jazz (semi-hollow guitar) 0.9 plastic pick with pointed ending … perpendicular on .11 gauge strings for rock/blues (i.e. pointed ending for me is must have for artificial harmonics) sometimes 0.6 oval plastic pick for nylon stringed guitar (but most of time i play with my …
answered Aug 31 '11 by Hubert Czerski
1
vote
For me the pick with sharpend end (sometimes this is called jazz shape) helped in mastering this technique. It was instantly change: Standard pick = i can't do this and then sharpend pick = i can:) …
answered Sep 3 '11 by Hubert Czerski
7
votes
much easier with sight reading than with tabs (or putting notation into a software like Guitar Pro) are: rhytmic playing, harmony, fretboard knowledge/phrasing and probably much more. So if You are …
answered Jul 10 '11 by Hubert Czerski
16
votes
hard task, guitar could be your instrument, up to the master level ( =Django level :) Also, you have the option of alternate tuning and slide techniques, as others mentioned. Good luck in your musical journey. …
answered Sep 25 '11 by Hubert Czerski
2
votes
I know the book/guitar method which teaches exactly the way You want. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/Mickey-Baker-s-Jazz-Guitar/3596589 It focus clearly on useful things (chords, scales, etc … .) to be practical out-of the box. The pace is intended not to be fast. Author recommends one chapter a week routine. After a year You should be performing jazz player (yes, this is a jazz guitar
answered Jul 15 '11 by Hubert Czerski
1
vote
and patience. Chord You try to finger is basic chord, that You find in the start of learning the guitar chords path. Your fingering will not help You to progress on this path to more advanced chords …
answered Jul 27 '11 by Hubert Czerski
8
votes
Of course it is not necessary, but WHY should You not to do this? If You play a lick in one place on fretboard and just want to try it one octave up or one octave down? What would You do? If it's st …
answered Sep 29 '11 by Hubert Czerski
13
votes
Expanding Daryl's answer - here is a fretboard diagram with octave shapes: A circle marks all "e" notes in standard tuning. Of course, you can move whole shape up and down the neck for other notes. …
answered Aug 24 '11 by Hubert Czerski
3
votes
3answers
can define a piece within this genre. For blues this could be: blues progression, using a blues scale, string bending, blue notes and so on. What about fusion guitar? (or the whole fusion genre) I …
asked Aug 2 '11 by Hubert Czerski