4

Five-string basses in orchestra would be tuned BEADG (from low to high). Another option, which would be used more for solo work, would be EADGC, with the fifth string being an additional higher string instead of a lower one. There are a number of pieces that call for (explicitly or implicitly) lower notes than the typical 4-string bass can play. Schubert'...


3

I can't can't speak to double basses, but as for bass guitars Answers on 5 strings bass guitars are also welcome. I get the impression that the extra string is more commonly B on these. A 5-string bass guitar typically adds a low B, but I have heard of people using a high C instead. A 6-string bass guitar typically adds both a low B and a high C. As for ...


2

To be perfectly honest, I wouldn't recommend this at all! Get it professionally done, as you have stated you could ruin the bridge that could create noise. I had a bass that was perfectly normal (2nd hand bass) but had the bridge filed down for lower action. Unfortunately it created a buzzing that drove me to just getting a new bass.


1

There are machine heads on the market that look like they'll match yours. The problem may be the space between the A and B string machine heads. Best is to contact the manufacturers of both the heads and the bass, and ask the question there.


1

I had the same problem. I have a 2011 Fender American Deluxe Jazz V. I went to change the stock strings for a set of flat wounds. The B string is a 0.132, which is a big fat string. I can string through the body or through the bridge. Either way the wrapped end with the ball would not fit through either way leaving about an inch to go to get the ball at the ...


1

I just treat the five-string like a 6-string missing the high E. It's a lot easier than trying to figure out what notes to play on the B and makes for some super heavy sounding drop-D notes. Tune it in EADGB and either play standard or drop the D. Unlike the person who took the actual heavier string and put it in the 5th string position, just tune it like a ...


1

Five string double basses in symphony orchestras sometimes are tuned CEADG, with the idea that the lowest C corresponds to an octave below the celli's lowest note. However I beleive this is 'old school' and most players today use the BEADG tuning. (Some four string symphony orchestra double basses has a 'drop-C' neck extension feature on the E string.) (...


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