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10

It is sometimes referred to as a dotted rhythm because the first four notes are all dotted eighth notes. I think it is popular because it's a very easy way to disrupt the normal pulse. Basically, what you are doing is overlaying a pulse that is different from the regular pulse. It works very well as a fill between sections for this same reason. If it ...


7

As the comments have suggested, there are a number of ways to define "music", some more subjective than others. But a good starting point would be that music is "organised sound", with the one crucial caveat that it is sound organised temporally (i.e. "in time"). Therefore you could remove arbitrarily many parameters from a performance score and the result ...


6

There is no need to strengthen your R5 for this passage. It's not a question of force, but of control. This is a piano passage, so what you should so is reduce the energy in the three remaining notes. Then the highest note will automatically sound accented. But even if you did have to increase force on the highest note, you wouldn't do it with an isolated ...


4

I would define music fairly broadly, as sound that... has been produced with some degree of intention has been presented in a context in which it is intended to be enjoyed or appreciated in some way. So a two-tone alarm sounding to tell you that there's a fire isn't music, even though it's deliberately organised sound - until someone records it and puts it ...


4

Keep in mind that you're looking for a melodic phrase with that second note, that imitates the melodic phrase in the first note in the earlier passage. So there are some deeper subtleties than just playing all the accented notes equally. You need to keep some form of primary accent on the first note, and a secondary one on the third note, as in any ...


4

Anti-accents (or 'ghost notes') are not commonly used in piano music. So, of course you're 'allowed' to use them, but it would be sensible to add an explanatory note.


3

I assume you mean the difference between ^ and >. Both signs are used as accents in generally. The correct designations are marcato (>) and martellato (^). Usually marcato means accentuated and martellato means strong accentuated. So you see that there is only a small difference. And it is often discussed how exactly these two accents are played differently ...


3

Strong opinions ahead... Almost1 all *ahem* proper instruments will inevitably introduce some dynamic variations, because the player will (deliberately or involuntarily) hit each note a bit differently. And a good musician will intuitively get this “right”, whatever that means exactly (there will be more than one right way). Surpressing this ...


3

Typesetters add modifying symbols such as stress marks, dots, staccato's etc. per voice or staff, not per system. So in your second example, the accent mark is only applying to the right hand octave.


2

What you're describing is very close to the Afro-Cuban Clave pattern. It's a very popular motif which has found its way into many modern styles. The second example you give even has a name in Latin music: Tresillo, meaning triplet. Source: Wikipedia


2

A complicated proposition to be sure: you are now wrestling with: What I've been taught doesn't fit for what I want to do. This is normal for everyone who writes music. Your patterns of articulation won't make any sense if they don't complement the way the phrase is written. The whole point of articulation is to articulate (see: "express") the line that ...


2

Not sure if you'll like this answer, but the examples you're giving for the problem are actually the answers to your question. There are a couple ways the composer can impact stress with the meter: Orchestration: give players accent, staccato, legato, marcato, etc; to impact the stress a listener will feel on any given beat. Instrumentation: choose which ...


2

Horizontal accent marks, that look like '>', go close to the note head in single voice music (c.f. page 9-10 of this style guide). In multi-voiced music, the accents for the upper voice(s) are above the music, and thus are "on top of the stems", and the accents for the lower voice(s) are below. The convention to keep '^' style accents above the notes, ...


2

We were talking about this just a couple weeks ago in band. An accent (the one that looks like a greater-than sign) we played with a bell tone in mind. Hit it hard and then back off slightly (it does, after all, look like a small decrescendo mark.) The marcato (the one that looks like a pointy hat) meant to hit it hard (and perhaps even slightly harder ...


2

I've never seen them in piano music. Although I can't remember where (was it Prokofiev who liked to do it?), I have seen an "sp" written on a particular beat, to mean "subito piano." Perhaps you can use that. You could examine Beethoven's habit of writing "sf" over various notes for the opposite effect; I suspect that most pianists' familiarity with his ...


1

Part of the basic concept of meter is that the first beat of a measure is accented. There is no need to specifically write out that default accent on beat one in notation. If beat one gets an accent by default, it stands to reason the other beats are unaccented. 2/4 meter should have a kind of | BOOM pa | BOOM pa| feel where BOOM is the accented beat one. ...


1

There are anti-accents in piano-pieces by Schönberg and Kurtag. E.g.: Schönberg - Klavierstücke op.23, #5, Walzer, bar 68 Kurtag - Jatekok


1

Rock, pop, and rhythm and blues often emphasize the second and last beat. This emphasis also serves as a backdrop to funk (more below). Reggae has an even heavier emphasis on the same beats often accompanied with an offbeat emphasis. Regarding the bonus question, jazz emphasizes the offbeat and in the jazz "subculture" the band leader typically counts in by ...


1

Quoting Wikipedia, The mazurka (in Polish mazurek, plural mazurki) is a Polish folk dance in triple meter, usually at a lively tempo, and with "strong accents unsystematically placed on the second or third beat". My suggestion, then, is to listen to a recording or two (there are dozens on youtube.com) and try to pick up the beat patterns.


1

If the accent pattern changes often, then just use conventional accents. Chopin's Etudes op. 10 and op. 25 are full of this. For varying amounts of accent, also use the "marcato" accents favored by Liszt in e.g. his Transcendental Etudes. For many finely distinguished degrees of accent (like klangfarbenmelodie or integral serialism), alter the note itself ...


1

The term that is commonly used in music parlance to describe the duration of a measure as well as the duration of a note of a given value is "beat". Another term that has been less commonly used in music is "mensural" - which is defined as "of or involving measure" and in music - of or relating to music in which notes have fixed values in relation to ...


1

Do you need anything more complicated than "duration"> "What combination of notes and rests have a total duration of 12 beats?"


1

If you want to play faster accents like in semiquavers you need to practice your way there. Starting with this videos technique you need to practice the shown attack there dividing gradually into smaller and faster accents. In the video you have 1 accent per bow. Practice that first. Then make 2 accents per bow. In this phase you are not trying to be ritmic ...


1

You can accentuate fast notes in flow by using, well, fast bow speed, making the bow travel a larger distance than other notes. A bit like a stroked rather than thrown spiccato.


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