7

Is there a B♮ in the previous measure? I'd guess there is, and the flat is just a courtesy to remind you of the return to normal key signature. By definition, courtesy accidentals are not mandated by notation rules and the score is unambiguous without them (they're there because somebody thought it would make it easier to read). Sometimes they're printed ...


7

No, the second E should be flat. However in this case, I really think the composer should have written a "courtesy flat" to make that clear. Just FYI: this descending tritone going down like that over a bass moving by 5ths is a nice little device. You should remember it!


6

The single vertical line is a "bar line" and denotes the end of a bar (also called a "measure". The two thin lines are also a variety of bar line, as is the thin/thick pair. All of those various types of bar line indicates the boundaries of measures. The single bar line is the most common. The two thin lines typically indicate the end of ...


5

The G natural is the chromatic lower neighbor to the A♭. It parallels the A natural that occurs in the preceding beat 2 as the chromatic lower neighbor to the B♭. This use of chromatic lower neighbors is casually motivic. The below reduction shows (in red) where they are used is measures 1–8. In the specific case asked about, the underlying chord is D♭ major....


4

You are correct that an accidental persists in the same octave until the end of the bar. You seem confused by the definition of a bar. That 'vertical line' is a barline. It denotes the end of a bar. So (assuming a key signature of three flats) the second E is E♭. Yes, it would have been helpful to confirm that with a ♭ in parantheses, a 'cautionary ...


3

Bb. For Bbb there would need to be an actual double flat symbol https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Doubleflat.svg It's impossible to tell for sure as the example doesn't contain preceding music, but it's probably either a courtesy accidental, or there was some other accidental (perhaps B natural) earlier in that measure.


2

There is another 'B' in another octave later in the bar. With no 'accidental'. That says to me that the one on the middle line was probably B♮ in the previous bar (the other wasn't there at all). So, it's probably a courtesy accidental, there to remind the reader that the barline has actually done its job of cancelling the prior natural on B. It really ought ...


1

I have a low-level observation on the following two melodies: The red part sounds a bit abrupt that was the question. But the blue part middle-line melody is totally reasonable. There are two parallel phrases in the second bar as the middle-line melody. The middle-line melody may be a good reason for choosing that natural A note in the first phrase, while ...


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