9

For starters, it's no G♭ chord. As it states, it's D♭m7, with a G♭ bass note. Which means, assuming you're asking about the G in the bass clef (note on beat 2), it must be G♭, which means it's a typo. EDIT: just checked another sheet music, and the D♭m7 is beat 1, then beat 2 is G♭9. so it would appear - a. it's not a slash chord. b. the second chord is G♭9, ...


8

The term "accidental" comes from the (probably Medieval) Latin "accidentem" meaning "outside the usual state of affairs" or "by chance" and appeared in music in the 1400s. from "Online Etymological Dictionary" The term "accidental" often indicates that a property is not essential to the discussion....


2

Any key signature, whether it has sharps or flats, dictates which notes will be affected subsequently in that piec, until cancelled or suspended. On piano (tagged), they will generally change a white key into a black one. Accidentals are temporary changes to any note. They may be naturals (♮) which make an already sharp or flat note revert to a white key, or ...


2

The natural sign has no effect on what came before. It does affect any Fs afterward (but see below), but only until the end of the measure. Once the next measure begins, the F# comes back into force. The natural sign only affects Fs on the same line or space as the one where the natural sign occurs. If there's another F in the same measure, but on a ...


2

Dbm7-Gb7-Cb = iim7-V7-I in Cb: this makes sense as progression. And the chord sign Dbm7/Gb says the 2nd beat is still Dbm7 but above Gb. I agree with Tim.


2

The sub-topic, which addresses terminology of "signs" in key signature was already discussed quite extensively in this question. English is somewhat handicapped here by not providing a separate word for the sharps or flats of the key signature, which other languages do. The remaining issue seems mostly to be a mental interference of two unrelated ...


1

Sharps and flats are used as key signs and as accidentals. The accidentals came up in medieval music when melodies were tending to need a leading tone. This could happen as a change note within a tetrachord or at the end of a song to confirm the finalis (clausulae). We can assume that they were primarily played and sung by the performers or the organist ...


1

I think we need to focus on more meanings of 'accidental'. As well as 'by chance' it can mean 'incidental' or 'subsidiary'. These fit the musical definition rather better. So 'accidental' is an apposite name for those incidental sharps, flats and naturals. But @Tim also asks for a more concise one. 'Acc' could be mistaken for 'acciaccatura'. 'Ac' ...


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