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44

From my experience, start really simple. I started with a metronome, and played a familiar piece at a variety of tempo's to get me used to listening to the beat and playing the notes in the right time as a result of an external influence. Move up to a simple backing track cd with a strong beat, something like a blues backing track for beginners. Keep going ...


23

Learning to play with others is a skill that needs to be learned just like any other thing that you need to learn to be able to play. "I’ve practised a piece all week and have it pretty close to perfect" How do you know it was "close to perfect"? Are you recording or videoing yourself and then playing it back? What you think you hear when you are playing ...


18

It often sounds quite amateurish to play the melody while the singer sings the same line. it's as if the piano player is having to help the vocals. generally, when I'm accompanying a vocal, I avoid the lead line. In the dots, sometimes this means leaving out the top line of 3 staves, or the dots with tails pointing upwards on the treble line of a grand stave....


12

You could try lots of things. Changing the rhythm pattern is one, but you could also try things that work with tone (timbre) and dynamics too. Here are some ideas that come from guitar, but I think should work on ukulele too: Palm mute. Creates a softened, quieter sound. You can increase/decrease the amount suddenly or gradually. Change the position where ...


9

Backing tracks take no prisoners! They won't stop and wait while you work out what the next note is. Don't worry about this. You're not alone. Can you get a copy of the backing track to practice with? If you're a computer sort of person you could slow it down a bit (even Windows Media Player has this function). Playing in time is a learned skill.


8

Yes, remove the melody line. If you double the melody line, you tie down the singer's interpretation to your own, taking away rhythmic and melodic freedom. Instrumental voice doubling is often fine in a choir setting. But for a solo singer, particularly where a song is to be interpreted rather than reproduced, it's a distraction.


8

It can, and does, but it depends on the exact nature of the accompaniment, and many times the best terminology is exactly what you've used already ... "accompaniment". For example, there's counterpoint, which Wikipedia currently defines as "the relationship between voices that are harmonically interdependent (polyphony) yet independent in rhythm and contour"...


8

If I'm understanding the question correctly, it sounds like you are describing what is called appropriately enough, "Chord Melody" which is a popular method to harmonize a melody line often seen in jazz arrangements, but can be used in almost any style of popular music. I'm guessing you got your hands on some of those kind of arrangements, but I can assure ...


7

In a way, what 'the chord' is at a given time is, by definition, the notes that are being played at that time - so yes, the accompanying instruments will be playing notes in the chord - but only because the chord is the notes that are being played... (etc. etc., round in circles...) If we followed that idea strictly though, it would mean that 'the chord' ...


7

I'm not certain if this is what you're after, but you may be interested in the concept of the melodic-harmonic divorce in rock music. In short, it's a theory about this repertoire that states that a melody and its underlying harmonies don't always work in tandem the way they traditionally did (like, for instance, in a Christmas Carol), with dissonant pitches ...


6

You could try to play 4 bars of the backing track and then skip 4 bars and try to enter. (my first thought was you might be stressed by the social situation, but then I remembered how difficult it was as a beginner when I dropped out to reenter. If this is your problem you could practice and train this also without harmonica and see if it works: I call ...


6

Maybe when you play alone you unknowingly stop for a fraction of a second whenever you are unsure what to play, or even when you know a difficult part starts. I think I have this problem, with the result that you describe: when playing with a backing track there's not enough time. I would still feel that I can play the song, but only alone. Others gave great ...


5

I'm going to give you a very simple answer. (Some might say simplistic! But I hope it is useful for you as you begin your studies of music theory.) Often, yes -- but imagine a bass line. It's common, and lovely, to make the base line more melodic by inserting some notes that aren't part of the triad. Other voices in the ensemble can do that too -- but ...


4

I'm not sharing yo's misgivings. I use a dynamic mic- Shure 58 (others are available!) just like a heck of a lot of other stage vocalists. It's on a boom stand sited on the opposite side of the keys to where I sit/stand.So it points directly at me, as a mic should. It doesn't pick up anything extraneous, and is only switched on when I'm singing. The stage ...


4

My band, a three piece rock/techno/metal band, only uses drums from a machine. We did initially use live recorded drums, but for the type of music we play, we needed the rhythm section to have exact precision, to tie in with stage effects or video, for some events. So the entire rhythm section is generated within a DAW, using various tools, and synths and ...


4

When composing or creating a melody line to go with your chord progression (harmony) your safest bet is to choose a chord tone for the first note played after or simultaneous with the chord change. A chord tone is any note contained in the underlying chord (one of the three in a triad or one of the four in a 4 note chord such as a 7th). But you can ...


4

Perhaps you're referring to the idea of countermelody? There can be many melodies in a song, playing at the same time. One (usually) is the primary one, but the accompaniment often has other melodies floating around, which are often called countermelodies. It's important that the countermelodies don't get on the way of the primary melody, to avoid ...


4

Here's how I learned to write multiple melody lines playing at the same time: Study four-part harmony and voice leading. You'll want to learn chord analysis and how consonance and dissonance work. Study some of Bach's 2 and 3 part inventions. Pay attention to how the different melodies work together. Do chord analysis on at least one two-part invention. ...


3

When there's no vocals, the r.h. needs to play the melody. It may well put chords in under this, but the l.h. takes on the job of bass line and chords, often. As soon as a vocal line is sung, there's no need for the r.h. to play the melody, as that's taken care of - unless it's doubled up, or harmonised. So the r.h. can take over chords, and other ...


3

A good example is used by Bill Evans on So What: Bill used the kind of chords you mentioned, while adding a third at the end. The theorists have categorized these kind of chords as 'So what chords' There are many modal jazz songs that use these kind of voicings; like 'Impressions' by John Coltrane. So, you can feel free ...


3

It will be beneficial to learn some music theory. In that way you'll be able to identify repeating patterns (like the II-V-I chord progression). It is easier to memorize larger chunks, so learning how to identify patterns by e.g. chord function should make it easier.


3

Start by imitating people whose style you like. Then you can use what you learn when you're making your own music. I listened to the video you posted and here is what I hear: Basic 2-beat pattern for 7 measures (if in 2/4) Simple fill (one note at a time, 3 or 4 notes in a row) for 1 measure Repeat with a different basic pattern I heard the following ...


3

There are many reasons. Some genres (electronic, hip hop etc.) pretty much require an unrealistic, machine like drum sound and performance. For some other genres (rock, pop, metal etc.), using a well programmed sequencer provides 95% realism for a fraction of the cost. By 95%, I mean that 95% (maybe more) of your audience won't be able to tell the ...


3

If you are playing solo, start by realizing that you are now the full band and you need to adapt your playing like so. Think of the drummer and the bass player as "navigators" on a ship, guiding the rest of the group. So the drummer keeps time and makes fills anticipating when a period is ending and another one is beginning and the bass player plays passing ...


3

I'd say the way to deal with distractions it is to practice it more. Playing open stages is a great way to improve your ability to play with "variables". However, even if you play by yourself, I think you can incorporate some things. I "play through mistakes" Adapting to mistakes that leaves my fingers un-anchored, or that throws my meter off simulates ...


3

Knowing the make up of chords will help answer. Take the third box (bar or measure). G add 2. That's G B D and A. Those notes are there, but also there's an E and an F#. So, obviously, the answer is no. The last bar chord is Em7b5, made up from E G Bb and D. There's also F# C and A. Answer no again. However, thinking past the question's wording, should it ...


3

First off, "jazz" covers a spectrum that is at least as wide as "rock" - from Frank Sinatra ballads to extremely dissonant avant-garde stuff. Don't judge everything by a couple of songs you heard once. Second, the song you ask about doesn't sound particularly jazzy to me - I would label it "technical death metal". Third, it is possible to blend metal and ...


2

I like to write down my music in tab notation software such like Guitar Pro or Tuxguitar. Over time the collection of your own stuff will grow, and if you can browse through your songs simply by playing them back, it's a pretty good solution for me.


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