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From my experience, start really simple. I started with a metronome, and played a familiar piece at a variety of tempo's to get me used to listening to the beat and playing the notes in the right time as a result of an external influence. Move up to a simple backing track cd with a strong beat, something like a blues backing track for beginners. Keep going ...


23

Learning to play with others is a skill that needs to be learned just like any other thing that you need to learn to be able to play. "I’ve practised a piece all week and have it pretty close to perfect" How do you know it was "close to perfect"? Are you recording or videoing yourself and then playing it back? What you think you hear when you are playing ...


9

Backing tracks take no prisoners! They won't stop and wait while you work out what the next note is. Don't worry about this. You're not alone. Can you get a copy of the backing track to practice with? If you're a computer sort of person you could slow it down a bit (even Windows Media Player has this function). Playing in time is a learned skill.


8

If I'm understanding the question correctly, it sounds like you are describing what is called appropriately enough, "Chord Melody" which is a popular method to harmonize a melody line often seen in jazz arrangements, but can be used in almost any style of popular music. I'm guessing you got your hands on some of those kind of arrangements, but I can assure ...


7

As a guitarist, if I'm playing with a pianist, I usually do a couple of things. If I haven't played with them before, I'll usually lay off a bit in order to get a feel for how the pianist wants to approach the comping. I tend to adapt my paying around my bandmates when I'm comping. If the pianist wants to do some complicated rhythmic stuff, I tend to go ...


7

I'm not certain if this is what you're after, but you may be interested in the concept of the melodic-harmonic divorce in rock music. In short, it's a theory about this repertoire that states that a melody and its underlying harmonies don't always work in tandem the way they traditionally did (like, for instance, in a Christmas Carol), with dissonant pitches ...


6

You could try to play 4 bars of the backing track and then skip 4 bars and try to enter. (my first thought was you might be stressed by the social situation, but then I remembered how difficult it was as a beginner when I dropped out to reenter. If this is your problem you could practice and train this also without harmonica and see if it works: I call ...


6

Maybe when you play alone you unknowingly stop for a fraction of a second whenever you are unsure what to play, or even when you know a difficult part starts. I think I have this problem, with the result that you describe: when playing with a backing track there's not enough time. I would still feel that I can play the song, but only alone. Others gave great ...


4

This is a tough call. Where on the finger board is not really helpful. The bigger issue will be two people comping simultaneously and having the rhythms clash. Do you have a Bass in the group? If not you could always play a sort of walking chord melody bass line in the lower register. That would fill up space and keep the steady groove going and act as ...


2

There is a prescription that places chords under melody in a way that produces harmonious results. Classical western harmony theory, which in many cases covers church style choir harmonization called homophony. Tim's answer touches upon it. And it sounds like you read about it. Basically you can harmonize any melody using the I, IV and V (or V7) chords ...


2

The best way to learn this is by doing. Take a very familiar melody and try to figure out chords that work. Start with something simple like "Happy Birthday". The melody starts on the dominant note of whatever key you're in. (For example, if you're in C major, the melody starts on G.) The first chord of a piece of music in a major key is usually the I chord. ...


2

Reading about it is not particularly a productive way to go. Assuming you play an instrument, it makes a lot more sense to get on and play. Play about with different chords. Feel and hear how they interact with each other. Find ones that don't follow each other well. There are no rules. There are guidelines. It's called music theory. It's no substitute for ...


2

The best approach is to zoom in a bit and focus on a few well arranged piano songs and learn the arrangements note by note. You basically need to figure out how it is being done - how to make simple chords sound good on piano by examples. Try to select songs in varied styles so you could build idiomatic vocabulary. For example Phil Collins' piano on ...


2

Possibly too wide reaching a question to answer here. Various ploys can be and are used. *Arpeggiating the chords. *Playing a bass line with l.h. while using block chords with r.h. *Chords with l.h., melody with r.h. *Chords with l.h., harmonising with melody with r.h. *Chords with both hands. *Chords and melody r.h., with l.h. bass line. *Chords with ...


2

You don't say whether you're playing an improvised line or from notation when you perform to the backing track. But if you're playing an improvised line I'd suggest at first improvising using exactly the the same simple rhythmic figure in every bar, starting with the first beat of each bar. This is to build awareness of where the downbeat (beat 1) actually ...


2

I play piano myself, and I recently played with a trio with guitar and bass for the first time. My experience, as a piano player, when having a solo, was that the tight, clustered left hand chords (Bill Evans) worked not so well with the guitar comping underneath. The alterations may clash, especially when the guitarist used tight voicings of his chords. ...


2

Don't play full 6 string chords, but partials (look at the LCJO tutorial on YouTube). Don't play all the time. Listen a lot. Listen some more to the Nat King Cole Trio with Oscar Moore or John Collins.


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Find out where your guitarist likes to play on the fretboard, then go to a different register on the piano keyboard. What to do will be very different if the guitarist wants to play open-string voicings or spend most of the time somewhere above the 12th fret, an octave higher.


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Did you look up fingerstyle slapping as piiperi suggests: I‘found this video that teaches, how to master finger style slapping (10 exercises):


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There are a few things he's doing with the rhythm. I'm not sure if there's a name for the whole effect, though. The slaps happen on beats 2 and 4, constituting a backbeat. There's a chord on beat 1 and a staccato chord on the last 16th note of beat one. This is sometimes called an anticipation. The bass thumps are on the last 2 16ths of beat 2, stopping ...


1

If you mean the rhythmic accompaniment of the right hand: On certain beats, instead of a full strum of the strings, we mute all the strings with our strumming hand, and simply run the pick across the dead strings, creating a "blip" kind of sound. This sound creates a very pleasing rhythmic contrast to the rest of the strums, which carry a full tone. The ...


1

I do not think there is a way of distinguishing between "vat-produced" counterpoint and arpeggiated accompaniment, unless said accompaniment repeats the arpeggiated chord as an exact same sequence of notes every bar/division of a bar, whether it be by ear or on paper. Even then, counterpoint can be repetitive as well. There's too much to say here, as ...


1

I think you are asking what are the 'accompaniment, harmony, and dynamic' aspects of polyphonic music. You already see the comment about not posting homework questions. I'll give you a few points of departure to explore to help you find the answers yourself... Polyphonic accompaniments: look up basso continuo and compare with fugue. Then look up Bach's ...


1

I think 'improvisation' connotates for many people improvising a melody over chord changes like in jazz or a rock guitar solo. But, you are asking about improvising the rhythm part - the accompaniment part. You can try finding resources using keywords like 'accompaniment' or 'comping'. You can also look for guides along the lines of 'how to play from a lead ...


1

Playing with other people involves bringing a whole lot of skills together. most of which require you to step outside yourself and look back. First, you have to hear yourself: did I produce the sound I was trying to make? That means comparing what you are hearing to the musical image that was in your head. Then you have to hear what the other person (or ...


1

Let's break it down. Is the problem physical or mental? (i) It's physical - This is very likely for a beginner. You are focusing so much on moving your mouth to the right place and breathing that you simply don't have time to listen to others at the same time. When you play on your own, you are, without realising it, stretching your subjective time to fit ...


1

...any rules I have to follow? No. But, sort of yes. If you don't think about "rules", but instead think about "norms" or "models", then yes you have something to follow. Following models is a time honored method of learning. ...find the right or suitable chords for a melody... You must study harmony and analyze the harmony of songs you want to emulate. ...


1

You've been offered a comprehensive list of ukulele techniques. And suggestions on elaborating a simple harmony. But maybe they aren't necessary. Maybe they'd just get in the way of the song. You ask how to "make this more interesting for ME to play". But what does the SONG need? Try strumming along gently and listen to the words of the song. Maybe ...


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