37

Not everybody can do this but the trick is your finger forms a 2nd, partial barre at the 3rd fret, but bends so it raises above the highest string. Some people play A like this as standard however I believe it partly comes down to luck how long your fingers are, how practical this technique will be. Check out this awful drawing:


37

I use this kind of "A-shape" barre chord all the time, although I must admit I rarely teach it to students. I actually find it easier than using fingers 2, 3 and 4 to play the three fret 3 notes. All you have to do is bend your third L.H. finger backwards, so that the joint nearest the knuckle moves forwards and away from string 1. Here's a picture of me ...


32

Yup, probably. A few reasons I say this: In my experience, the biggest strength of Yamaha musical instruments is consistency -- to see something that looks handwritten is a pretty big red flag. You haven't mentioned a serial number at all. I assume that if there was one, you would include it. One aspect of that consistency is that every single genuine ...


29

Partly due to the thicker string gauge, but also because you will be plucking the string closer to its middle point (if your pick or R.H. finger/thumb plucks in the same place.) This excites fewer of the upper harmonics of the string, giving a mellower sound. In classical guitar music you are often asked to play closer to the middle of the string to produce ...


29

If it's a brand new guitar, it's likely that the strings on it are new as well. New guitar strings have a certain amount of stretchiness that can cause them to become flat (e.g. go down in tuned pitch) over time. When I change strings on my guitars I usually manually stretch them to try and remove this stretchiness. Have a look at this question for some ...


26

It basically comes down to how the way the notes/beats are emphasised affects how your ear hears how the beats are grouped. Listening to a piece in 5/4, you'll hear that the beats are audibly in groups of 5. Try counting '1-2-3-4-5' with the beats in these songs, and you'll find that your counting stays in sync with the rhythmic pattern in the song... ...


25

I leave all ten of my acoustic guitars tuned all the time. In most cases it is not a problem to leave your guitar under the full tension of standard tuning for days or even weeks at a time. However, if you know you will be storing a guitar for an extended period of time (months) without playing it or changing the strings, it is probably a good idea to de-...


25

I'm going to post the dissenting answer here in that I feel like you don't want to look for a different kind of guitar or a perfect strap height. Most of my time in bands has been with at least one female guitarist or guitarist/bassist in the band, and in one band that I was in for a few years I was the only man. I also am a big fan of several bands feature ...


24

It's called a tailpiece. It's there to keep the strings' ends in their right places. Instead of the strings stopping directly behind the bridge, their ends are trapped in slots, and the tension they produce is taken to the end of the guitar, which saves it from pulling on the body of the guitar.


23

As others have noted, the properties of the signal from the microphone and from the piezo pickup will be different. The microphone picks up the same kind of air vibrations your ear does. The piezo pickup picks up the vibration of the saddle. The pickup has the advantage of being less susceptible to (but not immune to) feedback, and it moves with the guitar. ...


23

When you're dead. Seriously, though. Pick up that guitar. You're already better than the guy who didn't.


20

You can absolutely look at the strings and frets until you build up the muscle memory and then learn to play without looking. I can't imagine trying to learn guitar without looking ever. Professional guitarists look. It's good to learn to play without looking, but it's not something that should be 100% avoided from day one.


19

I think the confusion here is that it doesn't matter what order the notes are in. Think of a piano for second...you can pick any D, any F# and any A anywhere on the piano regardless of what order or how much space is in between the notes and you will still have a D major triad. You can also pick 2 or 3 of any notes and you would still have a D triad. Same ...


18

Neck width - and hence the distance between strings Neck thickness - affects the distance from thumb to fretting finger Fret height - affects how far past the fret you need to press in order to touch the fingerboard. Although note that actually touching the fingerboard is not necessary. Action - the distance from the string to the fingerboard. Action can be ...


18

Look at the edges of the soundhole. If the top is laminate, the soundhole will look like a sandwich. If the top is solid, the grain pattern will continue. More at this link. http://sixstrings.com.my/the-3-acoustic-guitars/


17

Imagine what chaos there would be in a guitar shop close to closing time every day! And even worse at opening time! Just smile sweetly at your friend, and let him carry on wrecking his guitar and wasting his time, but realise that actually you know far better and leave your guitar in tune for the next day. I've done it with about 20+ guitars for 50+ years, ...


17

Just about every guitarist struggled at some point with barre F. I only ever had one student who simply played it perfectly from the beginning. Despite what some people say, callouses won't help, and squeezing the life out of the neck won't either.Sounds to me like the guitar action is in need of some fettling. If you can put the capo on about fret 4 and ...


16

Capo quality matters, but not for tone. A better capo may give you more even tension on the strings, it may be more convenient to use, or maybe it's made of more durable materials or components that can be services or replaced as they wear. The guitar's tone will only become affected if the capo throws the strings out of tune differently across the neck, ...


16

These brackets indicate a "first and second ending." The measures under the "1" are to be played the first time through and those under the "2" are to be played the second time. It's a nice method of notation and can be extended to more choices. There are also things like "dal segno" and "al fine" and others. You should check them out; search the internet ...


15

Not knowing what the action is like on your guitar, it's difficult. You need to make the action - the distance between the strings and the fretboard - as low as possible, so the strings don't need pressing far.But not so close that they buzz. Also, you may well be pressing TOO hard, it shouldn't be necessary to squeeze too much, just enough to stop fret ...


14

You should not use a pop filter when recording instruments, unless the instrument is air-powered and your mic is in the line of fire (and if that's the case, there may be better mic placement options). The pop filter is meant to be as aurally transparent as possible, but it is indeed an obstruction that you are introducing between the instrument and the mic ...


13

Just to be clear, what you have are ball-end nylon strings, right? Because if you're planning on putting steel strings on a classical guitar, I'll have to advise you against moving forward. The instrument is not built for steel string tension. If they are nylon strings, on a standard classical guitar, Frets.com has a tutorial on the right way to restring ...


13

String tension is probably the most important factor, dictated by the gauge and tuning mainly. The action will affect how hard or easy the strings are to press, as a high action means further to move. The neck itself will have some bearing on this as a deep neck uses up more of your hand thus grip. A thin neck - both back to front and side to side, will make ...


13

I think it would be better not to do that. Your guitar's neck is built to have the tension of twelve strings. By removing half of the strings, you'll be taking out about half of the tension that needs to be there to keep the neck straight. This could even go as far as changing the neck's shape in an unwanted way. A luthier probably wouldn't be able to ...


13

Such guitars are called Silent Guitars. Try the pointers in the Wikipedia article or search for the term "silent guitar" with quotes around it in a web search engine. They are quite different from electric guitars, and you cannot sensibly practice fingerpicking on an electric guitar since it is going to shred your fingernails.


13

You wouldn't be able to play the D and the F# at the same time because they are on the same string. The only way to play both notes would be to play the D on the 5th fret of the A string, resulting in this chord: This is far more difficult to play and the sound of the chord is arguably very similar.


13

Any change in string gauge will cause a neck to move over time, unless you adjust the truss rod to compensate. Movement would be expected to have stopped & settled to its newly-balanced position within two weeks, with no other influencing factors. Primary shift would be within 24 hours. I think the advice you were given was rather limited; which makes ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible