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1

First off, don't look for any deep logic behind the naming of these chords. We can argue all night over what G7 and Gmaj7 SHOULD mean. But I can tell you what they DO mean G7 is a G major triad with the minor 7th added. G, B, D, F. Gmaj7 is a G major triad with the major 7th added. G, B, D, F♯. If you want to go on: Gm7 is a G minor triad with the minor ...


2

Not without purchasing some additional hardware. At the very least you would need something like this: https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/GUITAR2USB--behringer-guitar2usb Or this: https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/RCC10US14--roland-rcc-10-us14-black-series-1-4-inch-ts-male-to-usb-cable-10-foot You will also need some audio software for accessing ...


0

For rock songs, you can use drop D tuning (DADGBE starting from the heaviest string). Chords will now be a matter of locating where the root is, then fretting over the top 3 strings - you now have a “power chord” which is used in a ton of rock songs. Up to you if you want to use 3 fingers or just 1 by bar-ing over the 3 strings e.g. D - 000xxx E - 222xxx F - ...


0

As a general principle we can think 'Barre straight, slightly rotated; all other fingers curved'. Holding that barre finger straight and rotating it slightly to make it more rigid goes against a finger's natural propensity to curve, whereas the other fingers are just doing what comes natural. Your pinky will want to default to that rainbow/Sydney Harbour ...


0

It's a wound string on a classical guitar, by the clues. There's most likely a problem either with the winding, or the core - or both, that isn't easy to find, visually. As a stop gap, with no spare (why not?), maybe it's better than not having a D string at all, but the sensible thing to do is replace with a new one. If that new one makes the others - ...


0

Forgot to ask the actual question... xD // What do you guys think might be causing this? From the picture your pinky is double jointed. Double jointed pinkies are a serious problem for string instrument players. I'm a violinist and my right pinky is double jointed and this affects by bowing in a bad way. Regardless of the instrument and the hand the problem ...


2

To complete on @LaurencePayne 's answer: from the info you give I would assume you are talking about a classical guitar (edit: I now see the tags…), which strings are not ball-ended. If not, you would not have been able to put it back. If that is correct, you took some length from the peg to compensate the amount you lost. Doing so, you brought some "...


1

Does "sharper as if it's acoustic" mean something about the tone-colour? I guess this is an electric guitar then? Are the pickup poles individually adjustable? Perhaps the string's just worn out. A worn-out string typically sounds duller rather than 'sharper' though. Go on, lay out for a new string!


-2

geeks, dorks, scammers, slammers, babyback cramers. -2-4-6-8. This 'blob' has been inactive since 2016. who waits around all day to pee in the soup. thanks for the tips I received though. adios.


0

What’s the difference between a G7 and a G major seven chord? You have made an error which may be adding to your confusion. You should write and say G major seventh. The word major does not apply to the G, it applies to the seventh. You may be thinking G major (seventh). Instead you should think G (major seventh). In other words it is an ordinary G chord ...


1

The difference is in the size of the seventh interval: either major or minor. A major seventh chord has a major seventh above the root. A dominant seventh chord has a minor seventh above the root. The exact spelling of the tone of the seventh above the root using sharps/flats will depend on the placement of the chord in the key. The seventh chord built on ...


1

Harmony: G maj7 (GBDF#) is a stable chord and can be used as a tonic or subdominant. (In classical music it is very seldom as tonic, but as IV7 in the key of D it is quite usual). G7 (GBDF) has a tension for resolving to C (CEGC) - (because of the tritone F-B) and has a dominant function, this means it is functional quite different from G maj7. This theory ...


1

G7 is shorthand for G dominant 7 chord. GM7 would be for your G major 7. Gm7 for G minor 7. Most chord labels are shorter if the chord is more widely used. There's only a general preference for major. You can see most here on my site: https://pianocheetah.app/practice/chords.html (if a mod wants to copy that directly onto stackexchange, I'm cool with that)


5

There is a naming convention for chords. G = G major, or X = X major where X = any note, the triad is (1, 3, 5) G- = G minor, or X- = X minor for any note X, triad = (1, b3, 5) When it comes to 7ths just a '7' indicates a dominant 7th chord and that has a flat 7th. G7 = G dominant 7th = (1, 3, 5, b7) = (G, B, D, F), this is the V ("five") chord in ...


8

The difference is the kind of 7 you use. A "regular" G7 (also called a "dominant seventh" chord) is a G-major chord with the minor seventh added, so it's G B D F. A "Gmaj7" or "GM7" is a G-major chord with the major seventh added, so it's G B D F#. (For the sake of completeness, Gm7, or "G minor seventh", is ...


3

Both have the basic G major triad as a base. G, B and D. Since G7 (G dominant seventh) is the most commonly used 7th chord, it is called by its friends simply G7. It's diatonic in key C major, and has the addition of F♮. GM7 (G major seventh) has the addition of F♯ instead of F - the major seventh note in key G major. Thus it's a G major triad with the major ...


0

As other people have said - it depends on what you're playing. You're also very new to the instrument, so it's no big deal at the moment. However if you're playing a D or Dm chord then you very much do need to use your thumb on the D, otherwise you fundamentally can't get the notes you need to make a chord. If you're fingerpicking, you cannot move across ...


1

For expressiveness, whatever gets you the tone you want. However picking at 45 degrees has some definite disadvantages mechanically. Lower volume. If you're not plucking the string cleanly, it's not going to be as loud. Possible string noise as your finger skids along the string slightly. With your finger more "side-on" instead of "flat-on&...


0

Someone mentioned Mark Knopfler in a comment. He uses mainly thumb and first finger with occasional second finger. In one extremely fast pattern in Sultans of Swing he uses his thumb on the 1st string! Here's Mark Knopfler himself playing this. There is a closeup of his right hand alternating between 1st and second string with his thumb. Sultans of Swing It ...


5

Both, and everything in between. Each person will develop their own angle, and will vary that depending what sound they want. And again, depending on whether it's fingers or fingernails (and the way they're shaped). The 90 degree will give most force, so loudest, and clearest, but sometimes the tone and volume need to change, so more of an angled brushing ...


1

Both shapes are known to be one of the most versatile and common shapes. So, yes, generally speaking, it is not wrong to say there is no difference. However, this is a subject that affects acoustics and ease of use of the guitar directly. In these kind of parameters, just by looking to specs, it is really hard to say if it will feel okay or not. Probably, ...


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