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25" scale is fairly common, and often acoustic guitars with that are sold with .011s, so .010s will be fine. I'd go (and often do) to .009s, or even .008s, but that's me. With standard tuning, there should be no breakages strumming. Maybe you need to examine your technique, and not strum so hard, and feather the pick better. Your problem with barring could ...


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Additionally: An old luthier told me that the thinner-cored strings 'bend' as they vibrate nearly at the point of contact with the saddle, whereas thicker cored strings start their bend a little further away from the saddle, hence the need for a little more length.


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Everything Tim said in his excellent answer is exactly right. But I would like to expand on what he said for those who may encounter this question in the future and want a more detailed explanation. Almost all guitars provide some type of "compensation" at the saddle (part of the bridge) as a means of adjusting the intonation so the strings stay ...


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If the saddles are staggered, it's due to intonation. One may think that each of the six strings ought to be exactly the same length, but from a physics point of view that isn't so. Due to each string being a different density, and gauge, each one needs its own speaking length, which when adjusted accurately will make each fretted note sound better in tune. ...


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Probably not. I am coming from experience with classical guitars. Strings for steel string guitars have a large metal ball bearing of sorts on one end that goes into a hole in the tail piece (behind the bridge). Nylon strings usually do not have this and need to be tied at both ends (not a real knot but a twist that is held in place under tension). Also ...


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You ask about using a capo. By putting one on the second fret, you can use open chords as if it's in key E. The F♯ now gets an E shape, the B gets an A shape and the C♯ can be played as B7. Yes, there's an extra note, but that's acceptable in a V chord. The slightly odd one's going to be vi - the D♯m, which is pretty close to F♯6. By ...


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Here's my take on this. Chords where you only play the three highest strings, and you do not play the bass strings marked with X. The chords are not in root position, except B, but I don't think that matters, because the notes are so high anyway. It's a bit like ukulele.


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The name is volta brackets. Used to mark alternate endings used in conjunction with repeat sign barlines.


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If the action isn't so high that the string is being stretched to too sharp, it's most likely the bridge or its saddles are too close to the nut. It may not be an adjustable bridge, in which case there's little you can do. Sounds like it needs moving 2 or 3 mm back, which may well be impossible.


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If you're happy playing open chords as opposed to the barres involved here, take the song up by a semitone - most likely not going to strain any tonsils - and substitute as follows. G for F♯, D for C♯, Em for D♯m and C for B. Pretty simple and straightforward. The only drawback really being you won't be able to strum along with the track - ...


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Assuming the trouble for you is playing all barre chord, you can try playing the chord on 3 strings... F# xx432x C# xx312x d#m xx434x B xx444x You can't strum them in the way of open chords, but a broken chord pattern with pick or fingerpicking will work nicely.


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If you put a capo on fret 4 you can play three of the four chords using open chord shapes. F# at the 4th fret can be played with a 'D' shape: %x.x.4.6/1.7/3.6/2[Fmaj] C# at the 4th fret can be played with the 'A' shape: %x.4.6/2.6/3.6/4.4[C#maj] B at the 4th fret can be played with the 'G' shape: %7/3.6/2.4.4.7/3.7/4[Gmaj] The only slightly more ...


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What about smoke? I arrived on this board from a Google search for “smoke” or other things used to enhance acoustic’. I was only thinking this way because I am watching a documentary on Kentucky bourbon and the manufacture of charred barrels, which are mandated to be new barrels under bourbon law, but then sent to Scotland where they use these same bourbon ...


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Scrub vigorously with a DRY stiff bristle nylon brush. An extra firm tooth brush would possibly work. I use a nylon grout brush (you can google for examples) to clean polish compound out of wood pores and it works with not too much effort and no marring of the wood. Scrub both directions, with the grain first, then against the grain. You can slack the ...


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I have found the green scouring pads(plastic) commonly used to scour pots and pans, fairly effective for cleaning residue in wood grain. I use them dry and scrub in the direction of the wood grain, never across the wood grain. Patience and care are advised. Although ebony is a pretty hardy wood, it is possible to accidently scar it. If you find you need a ...


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That's far too high, even for an acoustic guitar (which would typically have a higher action than an electric guitar). You can look up recommended guitar actions for acoustic guitars online, but off the top of my head I think it should be between 2-3mm (depending on the string) on a standard steel string acoustic.


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Yesterday I could finally take it not to a music shop, because living in Cuba, the closest thing to a music shop available is the bazar where they sell conga drums, lol, but to a friend of mine whohas a little repair shop for electronics in general. We spent the whole day taking apart the preamp and measuring conectivity and looking for probable faulty ...


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Piezo processors come in two primary flavors. The L.R. Baggs Para Acoustic DI is a good example of the first one, straight up tone shaping. The unit is basically a combination of a preamplifier stage like you'd find on a combo amp, running through a DI transformer to produce the balanced lo-Z output. The Fishman Aura Spectrum is an example of the second and ...


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Your sound engy is hacking the guitar's connection to the mixer. To what end, I can't say, but I can say that the change in cable is significant and is the primary reason for your woes. Acoustic-electric guitars have a battery-powered preamp. To avoid that battery being constantly connected to the preamp, draining the battey when you're not using the guitar,...


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2/2 time means that there are 2 beats per measure and that the half note gets the beat. Counting 1-2-3-4 won't work since there are only 2 beats in the measure. In 2/2 time "1" is the first half note, "2" is the 2nd half note. Quarter notes would be counted "1 + 2 +" and 8th notes would be counted "1e+a 2e+a" or rather like 16th notes in 4/4.


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2/2 time is pretty well the same as 4/4 time, as far as counting is concerned. Just count 1&2&3&4&, using quavers for each of those 8 counts. It must work. I hope you're not getting the stems up and stems down mixed up. They all have their own counts, but where there is one of each, on top of each other, that's only a number or its ...


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On a cheaper Fender guitar, it's incredibly unlikely that you have a TRS connection from the Fishman pickup. You're just going to have a standard 1/4" mono cable (TS - but rarely called that). Buy a 10ft 1/4" Mono instrument cable. Connect it to the DI box you have, and let the sound engineer earn his money by using a standard XLR cable to connect your DI ...


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note: I've had to change my answer, thanks to a comment pointing out what's happening. TRS-XLR cables often don't work for connecting a guitar to a balanced circuit. The TS connector in the guitar does not have a ring contact, which means pin 3 on the XLR floats. The preamp on the mixer input works by measuring the difference between pin 2 and 3. If pin 3 ...


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