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If the first suggestion doesn’t work and your guitar has a truss rod, loosening the truss rod a 1/4 or 1/2 turn will probably do the trick. You can confirm this by holding down a string at the 1st and last fret. There should be a small space, about 1 mm or 1/16” between the string and the frets halfway up the neck. This is called relief, a slight concave ...


2

Grab a steel rule & set it edgewise on the fretboard between the E & B strings. My guess is it will rock over the 3rd or 4th fret. One is high, it's popped slightly. You can reset it by laying a piece of wood over the fret, rest the neck firmly against a surface that won't put strain on the headstock or body joint as you do it & gently tap the ...


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I'll say what I would do and let you decide for yourself if my hunch is valid. Before taking the strings off or reducing the tension on the top, I would use a small mirror mounted on an extending rod similar to a dentists mirror for examining teeth in the back of your mouth. I would use the mirror inserted into the sound hole to inspect the internal braces ...


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This is a fairly common issue on older acoustic guitars, especially those that were built for lower tension strings and have been strung with modern, high tension strings. Or those that were built with marginal bracing and top thickness to begin with, even for their original strings. It's hard to dictate a repair without having the instrument in hand. This ...


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Based on what appears in the photo, it's a bit hard to detect - you should take it to a luthier (guitar repair specialist) and have someone skilled repair it. I would not suggest trying anything yourself. By having a luthier repair it, you are able to look at years of a playable, great instrument. Martin is great brand of guitar. Take it to a few different ...


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Saddle position to obtain correct intonation depends on several variables - gauge and tension of the string, and action. Strings that are heavier, tighter, and higher typically need a saddle that's farther back to get the intonation correct. String style can impact intonation as well - wound strings typically need different setup than plain wound strings, ...


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It will probably work, but a rubber band or piece of string round the neck at 12th/14th fret will do just as well.


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Intonation will only ever be exactly right when the saddle on the bridge has been adjusted for the particular string in question. Put a different gauge string there instead, and the intonation will be out. Change by .001" and you'd prbably shrug shoulders and live with it. Whilst frets (generally!) are all parallel to the nut, the line across the saddles ...


10

This depends on what you are trying to play. Some day you may want to play one of those notes along with a note on the other string. Then the touching will be bad. There are a lot of subtle manipulations required for playing clean guitar. Sometimes we use our fingers to dampen strings so they don't vibrate with the one we played. Other times we need the ...


6

It's not bad at all - unless that other string sounds! In fact, it's a technique most guitarists (particularly electric using overdriven sounds) use all the time. It effectively stops extraneous noises from other strings sounding. Occasionally, you may want that top string to be still sounding, or leave it clear to vibrate as a sort of overtone from a lower ...


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Sharing my experience that was almost identical. I changed to slightly heavier strings, and I had fret buzz on the Low E only at the 9th and 10th fret. I tried replacing to the lighter strings but still same problem. I ended up adjusting my truss rod under the guidance of my guitar teacher. Somehow I had managed to change the action slightly. Perhaps that is ...


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I see there is an accepted answer but I'd like to add to this. It seems you are trying to get a consensus from the community about how long your development should take. This is a hard thing to objectively assess. If your action is high and strings a heavy gauge you might develop more than a callus, tendonitis. While it is true that acoustic action can ...


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I gripped a somewhat dull, serrated knife throughout the day; and was pain-free on my steel-string acoustic guitar within two days. I've also heard of guitar players using a credit card. Anything with a narrow, hard edge should work. YMMV.


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Closest I can find is a Musima Western 12 string - Made in Germany in the 1980s. No match on the fingerboard inlays or the roundel, though. The attached images are all from https://www.vintageandrare.com/product/Musima-Western-1984-Natural-46834#prettyPhoto


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I did a bit more research and I'm pretty confident that this is a Musima (East German) guitar since the stylized M on the tuners matches the logo of that manufacturer, plus the Made in GDR sticker indicates that it's an East German guitar.


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