10

I refer you to Wikipedia. The motion of sound can be hard to understand because we can't see its propagation. We can sometimes understand it more easily by analogy to waves we can see, for example waves on the surface of water, or light waves from a light bulb. Although they are different kinds of waves (sound waves are longitudinal whereas water and ...


7

1) The quantity of sound waves produced in air depends on the intensity or amplitude. If you pull your guitar string back a very short distance from its normal resting position, then the oscillations in air particles will be small, and they won't bang against your ear drum as hard. This produces a quieter-sounding noise. The frequency 440 Hz is how many ...


4

In other words, if i pluck an A string on a guitar with the A being 440hz, that means that single pluck has ejected 440 sound waves into the space which are now reflecting off surfaces? No. The string will start generating sound waves at a rate of 440/second. How many waves it will generate, depends on how long you allow the string to vibrate. If you don't ...


3

From the comments you seem to be asking not about the frequency spectrum, but about the stereo field. Yes, this is probably done by adding pseudo-stereo information using a 'stereo reverb' plugin. It conceivably COULD have been achieved by recording the (marimba?) sound in a very reverberant room with stereo microphones, but I suspect it's a dry sample ...


2

It will all depend on the size and shape of the room, and where the sound source and listener/microphone are located in the room. Sound travels in all directions and reflects off of most surfaces, so the width, length, and height of the room all matter. Sound travels at approximately 1 foot per millisecond, so with a little math you can calculate the delay ...


2

From my answer to your stereo reverb question It's worth noting that (mono-in stereo-out) stereo reverb is one way to artificially create a stereo field from a mono input. Other stereoization methods include comb filtering with a delay on one of the stereo channels, complementary comb-shaped EQ curves for left/right, and special stereo chorus ...


2

When speaking in terms of reverb, how long do early reflections take to occur/become audible after the direct sound? in addition to the other answers, this also depends on the decay time of the original sound. A long decay time means the direct sound can be louder than the early reflections. E.g. a single clap will generate audible reflections sooner than ...


1

Realistically, it may be 10 to 20 ms in a small room, and perhaps about 50 in a hall. (As has been said, it depends on several environmental factors.) If you're wanting to enchance a recorded instrument it'll be quite long--you'd want 50 and even up to 100, depending on the instrument and the sound effect you want. If it's too short, you won't be able to ...


1

It's already been done. George Kelischek's rauschpfeiffen can be "overblown" into the second octave: https://www.susato.com/collections/rauschpfeiffen Otherwise, no I don't believe it's possible to extend the range past nine notes without fundamentally altering the instrument. I've played some capped reeds with keys which extend the range slightly (a couple ...


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