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There are lots of papers about octave equivalence. Some lean toward a cultural explanation, others (citing birds songs) prefer a physiological explanation. https://www.quantamagazine.org/perceptions-of-musical-octaves-are-learned-not-wired-in-the-brain-20191030/ https://www.researchgate.net/publication/...


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I do not believe that there is a convincing argument for this. In fact recent research in cultural anthropology suggests that our tendency to hear octaves as "the same note" is due to cultural brain washing. I cannot recall or locate the article at this moment (I will edit when I do) but there was a recent article that introduced data taken by ...


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This might be a bit overkill but some may find it of interest.. A solution could be to pick the sound of the piano, EQ it in order, for instance to boost a bit the bass, and broadcasted in the room thanks to very clean loudspeakers... If the electronic broadcast part bothers you, or if you want to add a bit of caché to your room you can also use an acoustic ...


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Short answer: You may be interested in the chromagram and/or the Constant-Q transform. From the links cited above: Chromagram: In music, the term chroma feature or chromagram closely relates to the twelve different pitch classes. Chroma-based features, which are also referred to as "pitch class profiles", are a powerful tool for analyzing music ...


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If you want to describe a piece of piano music you could consider it as a function of one variable (time) with values in an 88-dimensional vector space. The vector components might be real (if you want to include loudness information) or binary (if you only want on/off information). I would suggest you begin by looking at MIDI files. An alternative approach ...


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If you want to see the waveform of a sound recording on your computer, download Audacity (it's free), load up the sound file and keep zooming in until you see the waves. You will soon realise that the wiggly line tells you very little about the melody in the music. It's just too detailed. In theory, there are a few ways to turn that wiggly line into an ...


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An equation is about says whether two things are equal. So, in principle, is it possible to ask: Is melody #1 equal to melody #2? Where presumably "equal" means the same melody. I would say yes. The method will depend on how you want to compare exactness, but I don't see how you can get away from comparing two sequences of values. If you encode ...


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