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4

The "test" described is being used incorrectly to support a potentially false claim. In linear system you will NEVER excite an undertone. This is simply not possible. It could be done by some non-linear coupling that cause sub harmonics to be generated. In Tim's experiment there is a false conclusion being drawn from the fact that plucking the high e ...


4

You have some good answers already but here's a test that I just performed on my upright acoustic piano. I pressed A3 (A below middle C) gently so that the damper was lifted but no sound was made. If you cannot manage this then play as softly as you can and wait for the note to end. Assuming that my piano is tuned well, the fundamental of this string is ...


3

I mostly agree with Carl Witthoft's answer, though I'd say the procedure suggested there likely falls under what the question described as "unconventional methods." Basically, if a sound is created by one sounding body, and another body is present with a resonant frequency among its harmonics that matches the first sounding body, then you can get a special ...


2

There are certain techniques on a Violin where if you bow the string with extreme pressure it will vibrate at one-half the fundamental frequency, although the tone produced is so scratchy you would only want use it in very select situations. The same technique can be used to vibrate the string at one-third and one-quarter of the fundamental frequency, so in ...


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