38

In many live music contexts, musicians have the problem of hearing themselves clearly. Typically when playing loud, musicians are positioned behind the main speakers (heard by the audience) to avoid feedback, and for the safety of their own ears. In that basic scenario, musicians only hear: the quiet sound coming from their acoustic instruments or voices ...


30

Gain is the input level control, it decides how hard the input signal hits the preamp. Guitar amps often exploit the effect of hitting it HARD, overdriving it into distortion. Volume controls how much the output from the preamp is amplified. Again, specifically on a guitar amp, there may be the possibility of driving the speakers into interesting overload ...


11

As long as you use it at a reasonable level you should be fine (no guarantee is offered by me though!) Remember bass amps can not only handle lows but can also handle the high frequency and percussive sounds of slapping and popping too. Here is an article with some good tips and precautions for using a bass amp with electronic drums: https://musicianshq.com/...


10

As a sound technician for my church, one of the most important roles is making sure the musicians can hear themselves. This is done by controlling the levels in the monitors. Often, these sit on the stage and are called "Floor Monitors". These sit between the musicians and the crowed, and are pointed back at the performer.


9

Yes it is normal. The gain is the volume control of the input of the amplifier. The signal flow of the tube amplifier goes: Gain (preamp input) to tone stack (eq) to phase inverter stage (input to power amp) to power tubes (amplifier). Amplifiers that simulate a tube amp follow a similar signal flow.


8

Mixing consoles don't have space to house top-notch (and expensive) discrete preamps. The Soundcraft preamps may be, well decent – that is, sufficient for any typical source: condenser mics and active DIs already pump the line with considerable levels, whereas dynamic mics and passive DIs are mostly used with instruments that are so loud that you don't need ...


8

Every acoustic instrumentalist needs a means to transfer the vibrations of his/her instrument to electric signal. This can be done with a microphone or a pickup. If you wish to use a microphone, you will need to "close mike." To ensure that no other instruments are "heard" by the microphone, close-miking involves having a microphone be placed in close ...


8

The demands on an amplifier/speaker combo designed to reproduce the sounds desired for bass guitar are different than for a regular guitar. To accurately and faithfully reproduce the low frequencies needed for bass guitar, the speaker surface must be able to move a greater distance and move more air. This greater movement demands more room in the cabinet ...


8

It'll be fine. It's actually a better bet than a guitar amp - the sound spectrum is far wider. It's the choce of several electronic drummers I know. The obvious is that you'll wreck any amp (specifically the speaker) by playing it way too loud. I used a Carlsboro Viper (15" speaker, no tweeter) 100w in the studio for a good few years with electronic ...


7

Without precise time alignment, trying to provide bass from multiple sources could lead to interference patterns which would cause the low end sound to be way too loud in some parts of the room and almost nonexistent in others. Even if that weren't a problem, high passing the signal before sending it to the mains means that the mains have more power ...


7

Another term for monitoring is 'foldback', which sums it up quite nicely. The sound is re-routed via speakers- on stage or in ear,in order to be useful to each muso. Care needs to be taken that the mix given to each individual is not tainted by any other sound source.Drums and bass, for example, need to hear each other far more than , say keys, so the ...


6

We can divide any complete all-tube guitar amp system into three major sections, each of which has important effects on the final sound: The preamp, the power amp, and the speaker cabinet. All tube preamps almost always exclusively use dual-triode tubes that are either 12AX7 tubes or very similar (e.g., 12AT7). The main aspects of a preamp that affect the ...


5

Of course there are many categories of both solid state and circuits that can affect tone and response, not to mention the many variations in speakers and cabinets. But the main difference between tubes and the majority of solid state amplification is the non linear transfer curve of a tube, vs. the nearly straight line linearity of most solid state devices, ...


5

Back in the day, there was more overlap between guitar and bass heads than there is now. Guitar amplification imparts a lot of the final tone that we love of electric guitars and most guitar amp designs are either similar to designs from the 60s and 70s or are meant to emulate the sounds of those designs. We do also love the bass sounds of the 60s and 70s ...


5

Your need is an amp with a line out socket. Plug guitar (presumably) into amp, line out goes to p.a. input channel. With your practice amp, the purpose of the headphone socket is to disconnect the speaker - for quiet practice! If others want to share, with probably only one input, you're going to need a mixer first in line. Mixer> amp> p.a. Another way is ...


5

Effectively, there are three controls to your equipment. Volume on the guitar, volume on the pre-amp stage of your amp., and volume on the post, or amplifying stage of your amp. With any one of those turned all the way down, the signal will not get through its entire path. Guitar volume down - there's no signal from the guitar. Gain down - the guitar signal ...


4

Important note: You can't connect both amps to that cab without blowing something up. You need two cabinets. There are some cabinets that support bi-amping, which is using two amps with one cabinet. Your cabinet does not. Your cabinet has two 1/4" inputs wired together in parallel so you can daisy-chain additional cabinets. Yes you can drive both power ...


4

Building a PA with mystery speakers is fraught with peril. The biggest question that faces you is: If you blow one or more of those speakers, who will care and how much will they care? Speakers that are not well marked are usually the cheapest kind. So you're probably not risking a lot of value, unless there's some kind of sentimental value or just ...


4

Yes, at least some gain is needed. When it's turned off, no signal is being sent from your guitar to the amp. Gain defines the signal input level to your amp. Thus, if set to 0, there will be no sound produced. Volume defines the output level of sound. For example: Both gain and levels refer to the loudness of the audio. However, gain is the input level of ...


4

I'd suggest a wired set of headphones. Bluetooth has a delay/latency that you just wouldn't care about when listening to iTunes etc, but it will drive you mad playing guitar.


3

If the sound from your amp is really what you want going through the PA, then the best way to get that exact sound is to mic the amp. Part of the whole amp package is the speaker itself. The only way to truly get that part of your amp into the mix is to mic the amp. At the church that I play at, all of the electric guitar players use this method. 1) It ...


3

If you plug in a more sensitive speaker cabinet to the 8 ohm output, then the resulting volume would go up, but because speaker sensitivity is difficult to increase by very much, even the most sensitive speaker you can buy probably won't give you more than a few dB increase in output level. A few notes about increasing your stage volume: More power helps, ...


3

The number attached to watts is not actually a very good guide to how loud it is. Other factors come into play, such as speaker efficiecy, sort of cabinet. Others may explain that better. However, when I use two of the same amps (for kbds, but it's the same idea) the sound seems to be more than twice. Say they're 50 watts each, for example, two makes 100 ...


3

You don't say if you're playing with a band using a house PA or are playing solo so my answer is going to be a little broad, but maybe that's good for the other folks. I'm not going to put any links into this answer because you can google all of these phrases to find what you need. Teh Internetz luvs to sell stuff to musicians. A DI unit, DI box, direct ...


3

The main difference will be the frequency range the head is capable of controlling. The lowest note on a guitar is not far off the top string of a four string bass guitar, so an octave of lower notes needs to be treated with some equalisation that just isn't needed by a guitar. Likewise, a guitar uses far higher notes than a bass, normally, so the eq. on a ...


2

Leaving aside questions of build quality, component quality, etc.: The answer is actually very simple. All audio reproduction systems have what we call an "operational range." This is the softest soft sound, up to the loudest loud sound, that the system can produce. Within this, there is something called the "linear operational range." This is the area ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible