51

If you look closely at the picture, you'll notice that pieces of tape are placed in very specific positions: one in the middle of speaker cone and the second one on the edge of speaker cone. Furthermore, look at where microphone is positioned - it directly aims the piece of tape. This technique is commonly used in recording - tape is used to mark microphone ...


24

A head is simply the name for an amplifier without a speaker. Your friends won't have heads on top of amps, they'll have heads on top of speakers (with the head driving the speaker). The "basic guitar amp" you have at the moment, is probably an amplifier and speaker combined in one cabinet. These are commonly called combos. There are several reasons for ...


16

Tim basically has answered your question but I think this deserves larger type: Your amp is trying to kill you!!! Stop using it and get it replaced or repaired This kind of problem is most common in older amps that have tube output stages. A tube output design for a guitar amp almost always requires an output transformer. The way the transformer is wired, ...


14

It is so the speaker is pointed more towards your head than your feet and so you can hear yourself better. If a small combo-amp is on the ground, the sound has to bounce quite a bit to actually get to your ears and if you are at a band practice or a gig it may mean bandmates can hear you better than you can hear yourself. If your speaker is pointed at your ...


13

Important note This answer is now obsolete. FlexASIO seems to be the current solution. I think I know where is the issue. My Windows-fu is rusty, but here is what I found. Solution, in short Get ASIO multi-client from here or here (they are different, you might want to try both). After installation you should be able to use your interface with more than ...


13

There are mainly three factors to this: Powerful speakers need (or at least used to need) heavy magnets. Lightweight cabinets tend to be less “acoustically stable” than heavy ones. And more easily damaged when handled roughly. 50 Hz transformers need a lot of windings around fat iron cores. (Plus, tube amps also need output transformers. And, ...


12

No, it will not damage the speaker. The high tones of a guitar are simply not capable of damaging your bass amp. Even if the amp isn't really suitable for these high tones (and in many cases, they can actually play them just fine), the amp will perfectly survive them. No harm there. The other way around is a much worse idea, because deep bass tones tend to ...


12

It is true that a tube amp should not be operated without a load, i.e. without speakers (or a dummy load) connected. Solid state amps don't have that problem. The reason is that (almost) all tube amps use an output transformer, which can produce high voltage peaks if its secondary (output) winding is not connected, because the energy from the primary (from ...


11

Most guitar amps have two amplification stages: The pre-amp which takes the very low signal levels output by the guitar and amplifies them to a higher level, approximately like line-level. The power-amp which takes the line-level signal and further amplifies it to drive the speaker. These are separate since different design considerations are important in ...


11

Basic troubleshooting demands isolation and substitution. You need to do some homework before anyone can render a meaningful answer. Here is your assignment: 1) substitute the guitar with another electric, do you get the same result? 2) if not, substitute the guitar cable, do you get the same result? Now if you don't get the same result in the first test, ...


11

Another couple of reasons why someone would choose head/speaker over combo : a comparable combo usually weighs more than one or the other, so is harder to hump around (poor old roady).Heads go wrong more frequently than speakers, so carrying a spare head to a gig is better than taking two combos. In defence of the combo, one doesn't need to remember the ...


11

When you get an amplification system there are typically three main components: Preamp, Power Amp, and speakers. The Preamp receives the signal and allows modification to the signal, such as EQ or built in FX. Preamps typically add a 'color' to the sound (basically tone), which is a big part of the deciding factor when purchasing one amp over another. ...


11

It is possible to mix the signal of two guitars before going in the amp. You can even plug two simultaneously into a single input with a simple Y-adaptor; you can mix the relative loudness with the volume pots (though it will be fiddly). A small mixer gives much better control, but the impedance of the line input on such mixers is usually rather too low for ...


11

The basic problem with a bass guitar in a guitar amp is that speaker and cabinet are not built for the low frequencies of the bass guitar. That means that at the low notes, the speaker will convert 99% of the electrical energy put into it into heat rather than 95% (numbers pulled completely out of the hat, but speaker efficiencies are indeed rather low). ...


10

I found ASIO Link and it lets you listen to windows audio as well and send audio over the network. The price $39.95 AUD on Nov 10, 2016 so please ignore the price information in the below comment by mateen-ulhaq. Update November 2019: As explained in this post, the developer of ASIO Link recently passed away, and his nephew authorised the software to be ...


10

I don't think it will work with just a split cable. One complication is ground loops, which cause hum. I'd recommend to use a stereo pedal, or a dedicated AB/Y pedal. You might still get hum, but there are some remedies, like rotating the power plug 180 degrees and plug it in again for one of the amps, using an AB/Y pedal with ground lift, having isolated ...


10

The signal between an electric guitar and a guitar amp is called a signal voltage. The voltage in the line oscillates in a manner analogous to the strings' vibrations, summed. The level of the voltage is dependent on lots of things including string material, how much energy is in the strings, and the electronics of the guitar. There is no specific standard, ...


10

Two basic philosophies. First is, set everything at 12 o'clock (halfway) and adjust everything up or down until it sounds right. Second is, dime everything (all the way) and back things down until it sounds right. If it doesn't already. There are other things to consider. A common metal thing is to max the bass and treble and pull back on ("scoop") the ...


10

I haven't found any comments on this question online from someone who actually knows a lot about amplifier design. I also have not been able to find any horror stories such as "I did this once and destroyed my amp/speaker", which I would expect to find if it were actually an issue. I have found many mentions of professional bass players using ...


10

Hi fidelity reproduction of high frequencies is undesirable in electric guitar amplification. If you look at what actually comes out of a guitar amp, things get really messy around 5 - 6 kHz and then drop off rapidly after that. This is a good thing. If you ever use any kind of amp or pedal distortion designed for guitar and then run it directly into a ...


10

Overdrive pedals like the tube screamer have a boost to the mid frequencies. When you turn up the output of the O/D pedal in the amp, the middle frequencies get more distorted, while the bass and highs are left more clean. This keeps the bass sound tight, which is essential for fast metal rhythms, and helps the guitars be heard over the low end of double ...


10

I went down a similar path to eventually starting a full band to accompany me on stage in paying gigs vs playing just for fun. My band has bass, two guitars, drums and vocal mics for all four musicians. What you would need for amplification of your instruments and vocals is highly dependent on the venue your band will be performing in. For a small pub, ...


9

No, there is absolutely no risk. You may have seen such amplifiers being stacked on stage during festivals/concerts, and those burdens can get heavier than what you weigh. Just make sure you're not hurting your ears by being too close to your amp when it's turned up to eleven.


9

Several issues come into play here. I use Jazz III picks, and I am of the opinion that for fast playing, hard picks should be used. There is a possibility that you are using too much gain, or extreme EQ settings which amplify the unwanted noises. Even so, using used picks will produce more noises, since they get a jagged edge. Most important though, is to ...


9

One other thing that took me MANY years to realize. The best EQ and tone settings to please your ear in a room by yourself are going to be surprisingly different from the ideal tone when you play with other instruments, and especially when recording. For example, the best guitar sound when a keyboard / synth is playing chords is often much more treble than ...


9

Would having the delay after the cab sim ruin it? No Would it sound different if the delay was in the effects loop? It depends. It depends on what kind of delay you are using and how it is changing the audio besides the actual delay portion. The power amp and speaker (or cab sim) in a guitar amp are kinda like an effect, sort of like a fixed EQ and ...


9

It depends, really. If you decide to connect it to the input your amp, you do want to disable the amp modelling in the pedal (assuming that's possible). I can think of three ways to hook this up. I'll list each way and reasons why you would choose it: Connected to the PA You should consider connecting directly to the PA if: You don't have a very good amp....


9

Bass amps have been used by guitarists for many decades. In some instances, they work better for guitarists than other amps designed for guitars, especially the speakers. If you are going to use effects pedals, they will do just fine, but if you're looking for something that will overdrive and distort, bass amps generally aren't designed with that in mind. ...


8

Since your uke is solid-body, you need the rest of your setup -- the amp, speaker, cabinet to give character to the sound. Fortunately the ukulele's pitch range is within that of a guitar's. A soprano uke is similar to the top strings of a guitar being played high up the fretboard. A baritone uke is similar to the top strings of a guitar being played nearer ...


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