10

I went down a similar path to eventually starting a full band to accompany me on stage in paying gigs vs playing just for fun. My band has bass, two guitars, drums and vocal mics for all four musicians. What you would need for amplification of your instruments and vocals is highly dependent on the venue your band will be performing in. For a small pub, ...


8

You've correctly analysed why the cable impedance does not matter in the way it does for HF transmission lines. (Though, the assumption of vacuum light speed is actually not completely valid – the dielectric factors into this, but it doesn't change the fact that the wavelengths are many times longer than any guitar cable.) That notwithstanding though, the ...


7

The way tubes work is that electrons are "boiled" out of the cathode by heating it, and then pulled across to the anode by the different voltages inside the tube. The only way you can damage a "cold" tube is by applying so much voltage that you pull the electrons out of the cathode "by force" and physically damage the cathode material permanently. Note, ...


6

This sounds normal to me - just an example of a prominent beat effect, exaggerated by the distortion: when the two tones are close in pitch but not identical, the difference in frequency generates the beating. The volume varies like in a tremolo as the sounds alternately interfere constructively and destructively. If you don't want the gap in ...


5

Edit: there seems to be some confusion here. Based on the description in the question, I'm assuming you have two devices that output a line-level signal, and you want to connect those to a device that only has one input available. If this is the case: don't wire the cables together directly. This may damage your devices: the output voltage from one ...


4

The chain is guitar > pre-amp > power amp> speaker. Putting any effects here - Guitar> fx > pre-amp > power amp > speaker means that the pre-amp (tones mainly) will affect the fx. Putting any effects here - Guitar > pre-amp > fx > power amp > speaker means that the fx are subjected to whatever settings the pre-amp has. Modulation, delay, tremolo are ...


4

The recommendation would depend on several factors. do you ever plan on playing with other musicians outside of your bedroom? Then the PC/ amp sim solution is a big hassle. You don't want to drag your PC to every rehearsal. does the amp that you own have a halfway-decent speaker? If not, all the pedals and amp sims in the world won't help you, your tone ...


3

There's no problem using a 20 Watt amp: just turn it down. You can set the volume of an amp as quiet as you want. It would probably be better to use headphones.


3

You typically will have a virtual footswitch - most of the virtual amps I use do allow switching from dirty to clean, or switching distortion on and off. Many will also allow a real footswitch to be used.


3

My first instinct would say its unrelated to the outage and more likely a ground loop issue. Have you tried taking your amp to another part of the house (or at least a new outlet) and trying to plug it in and see if it still makes the same noises? I know there are some product from EbTech and Furman (plenty others too) that are suppose to condition or ...


3

To elaborate and visualize the previous answers a bit further, here's a legend: Amp/head: the device that amplifies the electrical signal. This is an electrical processor that does not produce audible sound. Cabinet: the actual speaker that speaks out the processed signal and makes it audible. The above two come in two main flavors: Stack: The amp and ...


3

Better is subjective, the pedals will sound different when sent through an FX loop than direct. The difference is where the distortion is created in the amplification chain. There are two types of effects loop, parallel and serial which will have different sound and application also. An effects input in an amplifier is usually after the pre-amp stage of ...


3

While better is of course subjective and there are exceptions (yes you are right about the MT-2 Metal Zone that is the ONE 'dirt' pedal aside from a few 'few amp in a box pedals' that tend to work better if you plug input direct into them and then take output into the fx return bypassing the preamp completely. I wouldn't say its horrible in front, but it ...


3

It absolutely depends on the type of output. What you want to do is called "distributing" the output to a number of inputs. Some types of output are actually designed to be distributed, some are not. Some can, but only with a bit of care and technical consideration. (To know how and how many you need to know a bit of electronics, there is something ...


3

Rockin Cowboy has comprehensively covered a lot of points! A couple more thoughts for you. Consider what sort and size venues the band may be gigging at. There's a fair difference between a bar that can hold 50 people from an outdoor gig where there might be 300 or so. And the equipment will vary accordingly. As already stated, guitarist and bassist ought ...


3

One option is to hook a "power soak" up to the output of your amp. Marshall used to make one, but I haven't heard of anyone using them in years. A friend of mine used one on stage for years and was very pleased with the way it worked. I suppose you might be able to find out about them by googling. I hope this helps.


3

I think what you are looking for is an amp attenuator or what I think the other answer referred to as a "power soak" It will allow you to crank up the volume on the amp to drive those tubes while 'soaking' up most of the loudness and not getting you evicted while still getting those sweet tube tonez. I know UA came out with a rather pricy 'the ox'. Was ...


3

A few answers: I'd definitely suggest that yes, go ahead and learn a few solos you like. It'll give you many satisfactions and you'll learn a lot of useful things. If your strings break that often, it may be that you play a little too hard, or there may be some sharp edges on the bridge saddle, the nut, or even on some frets. This is common on cheap ...


3

My thoughts on whether or not to buy another amp or effects pedal: if it were me, I'd go down to the music shop and try out a few effect pedals and while I was there I'd play through a few different amps to see the differences in sound. At that point I might decide to buy a pedal or I might choose an amp. A third possibility might be that I'd choose to wait ...


3

The U2 ICE2A165 chip should be replaced by an ICE2A265 (just as cheap). It's a standard 8-pin IC; if I was working on that board, I'd pull the broken chip, insert an 8-pin IC socket and then use the upgraded chip (it has better thermal properties). Talk to another repair man - this doesn't seem like a challenging or expensive fix.


3

This is generally expected behaviour, but that does depend on your amp. Some amps are designed to give you more clean headroom, but you don't have much headroom in a small amp. The answer is to not crank the volume up as high. If you need more volume, get a higher wattage amp.


3

Doing so, you will not be able to enjoy the "full power" of your amp: because of the impedance mismatch, part of these 5W will no be transferred to the cabs. In the end you will get lower sound level that with using matched cabs (8 ohms) but this should not damage anything. In the end, the amp will deliver less current than what it is made for…


2

For a very small footprint, 2 amp system you could use a couple of iPhones, or tablets, or androids, old, new... whatever. Buy 2 guitar interfaces like Peavey Ampkit. iRig, etc.... Very inexpensive. Download the apps for the said devices, AmpKit, Amplitube, Tonebridge... Tons of options here. (many are free). Run both the signals to a mini-mixer from the ...


2

I want to piggyback on what's been said already. The Rolls SX21 is an awesome, small and wonderful tool to split your bass signal. I am doing things a little different though I am splitting the input between a GK 250w 1X12 and a TC Electronic 250w 2X10. But, the thing that I like to do different is use the 2X10 for the lows (under 200hz) and the 1X12 for the ...


2

It's unusual for a laptop to have any Earth at all. It will also probably have a nasty buzzy, whiny switch-mode PSU. If you live in a country where Earthing is optional on mains sockets, you may end up having to carry a physical earth strap & find a pipe to fasten it to. We really need more detail on the interface, the computer & your country's ...


2

Basic safety rule is use a speaker/cab that has more ohms impedance than the output supplying it. There will be a little loss in volume, but nothing to worry about. If the house cab was 4ohms, and you used the 8ohms out from the amp, that wouldn't be a good scenario. Always worth checking what the actual impedance of someone else's cab is, before plugging in....


2

We don't do "shopping advice" I'm afraid. "Is it worth it?" is something only the purchaser can decide. Your worry about valves is an easy fix… buy new valves. Tips for buying used valve amps - put new valves in & see if it's better. If it isn't, then next is change the capacitors. A discrete component amp is always fixable at component-level. ...


2

There are 5 watt class A anmps that are way louder than some 20 watt amps. The wattage is only part of the story. Obviously you can turn down the amp's volume but that's not really going to be a solution. By doing that, yes, it'll be quieter, but you'll lose some quality of sound, which is a lot of what playing through an amp is all about. In a flat such ...


2

Yes, it's very feasible. Some considerations. *In series, two 8 Ohm speakers will have an impedance of 16 Ohms. In parallel, two will be 4 Ohms. *Plastic sockets on a plastic plate will be less problematic than metal sockets on a metal plate. *May be better to split the cab vertically - just a thought. *With two different amps, therefore sounds, it ...


2

If you keep the speakers in series to get 16 ohms, that would match the output impedance of an amp with 16 ohm output. Electrically, this should be just fine. You can go higher ohms without hurting anything (8 to 16 ohms). Oh, EDIT: If the common of both jacks are on the same plate, that might create problems, depending on the amp(s). So best to insulate ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible