8

Bass amps have been used by guitarists for many decades. In some instances, they work better for guitarists than other amps designed for guitars, especially the speakers. If you are going to use effects pedals, they will do just fine, but if you're looking for something that will overdrive and distort, bass amps generally aren't designed with that in mind. ...


8

What you have described is inaccurate. Four 8 ohm speakers wired in parallel would result in a 2 Ohm load not 32 Ohms. To achieve an ideal load for you amp, you'll need to wire 2 of the speakers in series, then wire the other two in series, and then wire the two pairs in parallel to give you a perfect match of 8 Ohms for your amplifier.


7

I'm dropping this answer in early, assuming I might be right rather than being certain at this point. I posted an example of a totally different style track, but I think using similar techniques - so I can easily describe how I did that. I don't have the file to hand to be able to directly copy/paste or screenshot the settings, but I used this setup a fair ...


7

Ever heard the old joke about the farmer being asked how to get to a nearby famous landmark? There are a hundred versions of it, but there's one commonality... His reply is always, "Well, you don't want to start from here…" The thing about GAS* is that it's the wrong place to start. You have a Strat - live with it for now. When you get 'good' you'll know ...


6

Amps are designed to run at pretty well any volume - although high volumes can be dangerous - for the speaker, neighbours, and your ears. Although at low volumes, the quality of sound is often disappointing. You could consider having a small practice amp as well, a pre-loved one I bought recently cost me £10. Hardly breaking the bank, and good enough for use ...


5

Yes. But the whole point of a guitar amp is to NOT be 'accurate' but to distort in interesting ways. This aspect may be missing.


5

The Fender Bassman has famously been many guitarists' amp of choice over the years. A bass amp still needs to produce all the same higher frequencies as a guitar amp, because it's the higher frequencies which give you the "attack" of a note. So there's no problems with the speaker itself. As LaurencePayne said already, guitar and bass amps are not intended ...


4

Here is what I have found through trial and error: The Super Champ, while an amazing amp, is under-powered for live performance. The easy solution is to mic the amp,but that is not always an option. My Super Champ is the XD Model. There are two outputs on the back (1) speaker out. Should be currently connected to the internal speaker. You can use this ...


4

On the jack pictured, Positive (the tip of your cable) is the highest of the two connections, and the Negative (Earth - the body of your cable) is the lower. Connecting speakers in series will increase resistance, and connecting them in parallel will decrease resistance (as in the following diagrams from https://www.hometoys.com/article/2002/06/series--...


4

Looks like the OP found the issue but wanted to give some tips for others that may have similar problems. When looking for an issue like this it is a good idea to figure out exactly where in the signal chain the issue is. If you have a guitar > pedal > pedal > amp the issues could be in any of the cables, the guitar, any of the pedals, or the amp itself. ...


4

The simple answer is of course you can. You won't break the thing. But whether you get a satisfying sound out of it - it really depends of what type of guitar sound you want to use. It also depends on what type of bass amp you have. I'd argue that since the Fender Bassman's times when guitar and bass amps design were quite similar we had a substantial ...


4

It's a process of elimination (or illumination - throwing light on the problem...) by checking each item on its own. Unfortuntely, substitution is needed for this. But we can start with the amp. Is there a noise when it's first turned on? Can a hiss be heard with nothing plugged in, and the volume(s) turned up? Next the lead - usual suspect. When amp. is ...


4

Consumer audio products like the "sound bars" you mentioned are made for applications where precise timing is less important. Whether there's a 2.5 ms or a 25 ms delay between the input and the output isn't really important for music playback or even TV. These products often combine analog and digital audio sources, and the easiest way to add e.g. ...


4

Using a mic to amplify a guitar absolutely can make sense, but it also brings a hoard of problems that you don't really want to deal with in a live setup. I would strongly avoid plugging a microphone for an acoustic instrument into an onstage amp, that's a recipe for feedback disaster. Specifically in a big band setup, you will just need quite a bit of ...


4

Acoustic and semi acoustic guitars are prone to this sort of phenomenon - feedback. It's caused by sympathetic vibration, where an open string 'hears' its own pitch, gets excited by it, and starts to vibrate in sympathy. It ay be the guitar itself, or something in the room, that picks up on that frequency. At that point, the two sounds egg each other on. ...


4

The configuration in the diagram is not safe for your amp. All speaker jacks used on a tube amp must be connected to an appropriate load or the amp may be damaged from over-current. You can either connect a single jack to a load (speaker or load box) and leave the external jack unused, or you can connect both the normal and external speaker jacks to two ...


3

While it is true how to connect the amp to your PC depends on what outputs your amp provides, it is most likely possible without a mic. Most current amps have at least a headset jack. Some with have additional outputs. For me, I run a male mini plug stereo cable (like this one) from the amp headset jack to the input on my PC sound card. That being said, ...


3

My first instinct would say its unrelated to the outage and more likely a ground loop issue. Have you tried taking your amp to another part of the house (or at least a new outlet) and trying to plug it in and see if it still makes the same noises? I know there are some product from EbTech and Furman (plenty others too) that are suppose to condition or ...


3

No pitfalls, and actually acoustic amps can make a good match sound wise with archtop/hollow body type of guitar and bring out more of an acoustic qualities of these instruments.


3

The main issue with using an electric guitar through an acoustic amp will be the the use of overdrive / distortion pedals, and not the fact that the guitar itself is considered "electric". The main difference between acoustic and electric speakers is that the acoustic amp will generally have a tweeter to extend the higher ranges and give a more hi-fi like ...


3

Basically, you want the sustain part of the tone increased in relation to the attack part. There are three ways to do that with amps settings/ effects: either you increase the gain of the amp, you add an overdrive effect, or you add a compression effect. The first and second will alter your tone more or less drastically, the third should be a lot less ...


3

With an acoustic/electric guitar, you are usually dealing with a mostly standard acoustic bridge, where there is a piezo pickup mounted underneath the saddle where the strings run across. In an electric guitar, the strings are physically connected to a metal bridge that IS grounded into the circuitry of the guitar. In an acoustic/electric guitar, that does ...


3

A few thoughts on this. Playing at low volume will not damage your amp. Playing at the highest volume might. If your amp isn't playing low enough for you, consider practising unplugged. (Seriously). Would playing at a different time of day make your practise more acceptable? You could try getting yourself a practise amp, ask at your local guitar shop, they ...


3

I've listened to the link and it sounds to me like a problem I had when I blew my speaker. When the voice coil in a speaker over heats they can become warped and start rubbing internally. When that happens, the speaker can respond unevenly as it gets stuck and breaks loose repeatedly. A good repair technician can be worth his weight in gold when it comes to ...


3

I own a few practice amps/devices including the amPlug, orange crush and line 6 amplifi. They are all fine, but it depends on how YOU like to practice. Opinions aside, if you want to hear yourself play and you don't have any space and no budget, then the amPlugs actually sound good. Like you said, they are limited especially if you're looking for the chug ...


2

Yes you need a di box with a pass-through. Pass through TS to the amp and output XLR or TRS from the di box to the PA or mixer. Place the di box before and not after the amp by plugging your guitar directly into its input. Note that this is the preferred method when using a mixer but if using a PA you will get a much brighter signal from the guitar than ...


2

Aside from settings on your amp and the suggestions above, you could use some slight vibrato at the top of your bend. Don’t move the string too much but slightly up n down and you can get a longer ring out of it. You’d be surprised with how much you can change the sound with your fingers and the way you play the guitar. Granted, this comes with experience ...


2

First, find out what your teacher is using as a source - a microphone strapped to his acoustic guitar, a piezo pickup, etc. See if the output impedance and voltage of whatever guitar you're lending to him is directly compatible with the input specs of his amplifier. It may turn out that a preamp is required to match those parameters. It's rather like the ...


2

The eq on acoustic amps is slightly different from that on electric guitar amps - and that on bass amps, too. Having said that, any amp will amplify any electric guitar - and obviously, an electro-acoustic guitar is electric! There should be sufficient tonal control to get a decent sound that way, especially for playing in a studio, and teaching with. At ...


2

There is a 1/8" Aux In input on the back of the amp. So find a 1/8" Stereo cable, and connect the other end to the source of your choice. If you really want Bluetooth, it isn't built in. You'd need an external bluetooth receiver, which you would connect to that 1/8" input.


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