30

Gain is the input level control, it decides how hard the input signal hits the preamp. Guitar amps often exploit the effect of hitting it HARD, overdriving it into distortion. Volume controls how much the output from the preamp is amplified. Again, specifically on a guitar amp, there may be the possibility of driving the speakers into interesting overload ...


13

It's an oversimplification to claim that "the tone change is done in the preamp". It's the complete signal chain that results in the final sound, including the power amp and the speaker cabinet. Note that it's not only the tubes that make the difference between a solid state and a tube power amp, but also the output transformer, which is necessary ...


9

Yes it is normal. The gain is the volume control of the input of the amplifier. The signal flow of the tube amplifier goes: Gain (preamp input) to tone stack (eq) to phase inverter stage (input to power amp) to power tubes (amplifier). Amplifiers that simulate a tube amp follow a similar signal flow.


8

You've correctly analysed why the cable impedance does not matter in the way it does for HF transmission lines. (Though, the assumption of vacuum light speed is actually not completely valid – the dielectric factors into this, but it doesn't change the fact that the wavelengths are many times longer than any guitar cable.) That notwithstanding though, the ...


6

This sounds normal to me - just an example of a prominent beat effect, exaggerated by the distortion: when the two tones are close in pitch but not identical, the difference in frequency generates the beating. The volume varies like in a tremolo as the sounds alternately interfere constructively and destructively. If you don't want the gap in ...


6

Tube power stages only have a notable effect when driven at high signal levels, so they don't just linearly amplify the signal but soft-clip it somewhat. This is in effect also what high preamp-gain accomplishes, but it is controlled with the master volume pot – which really works the same way as the gain pot, except it's placed after the preamp(s) and right ...


5

It's for modulation effects. From the Spark User Manual, page 3: (H) Effects Control Adjusts the amount of Modulation, Delay, and Reverb in the current preset. Use the SPARK app to change the effects type and detailed effects settings. This is consistent with other amps. On Fender's Mustang V.2, the MOD knob is for setting modulation effects levels. There ...


5

Effectively, there are three controls to your equipment. Volume on the guitar, volume on the pre-amp stage of your amp., and volume on the post, or amplifying stage of your amp. With any one of those turned all the way down, the signal will not get through its entire path. Guitar volume down - there's no signal from the guitar. Gain down - the guitar signal ...


4

The recommendation would depend on several factors. do you ever plan on playing with other musicians outside of your bedroom? Then the PC/ amp sim solution is a big hassle. You don't want to drag your PC to every rehearsal. does the amp that you own have a halfway-decent speaker? If not, all the pedals and amp sims in the world won't help you, your tone ...


4

Yes, at least some gain is needed. When it's turned off, no signal is being sent from your guitar to the amp. Gain defines the signal input level to your amp. Thus, if set to 0, there will be no sound produced. Volume defines the output level of sound. For example: Both gain and levels refer to the loudness of the audio. However, gain is the input level of ...


4

Any “electric guitar sound” is a combination of three things: frequency response in the guitar itself, PUs etc. shaping through the amp circuitry speaker/cabinet response The third point is often underestimated, but it actually has a very significant contribution: the cabinet has a highly uneven response that drastically influences the sound. In particular,...


4

Ground loops! If you get an increased noise (esp. grid hum) it may be because you are using a common power supply. Other than that, and save for extra attention needed about polarity and voltage specs for all devices, it should work.


3

David Gilmour's tone is described on various sites, but the basic core of it is a clean tube amp with vintage pickups. His amps (Hiwatts) also have a lower mid range, so you can emulate that by turning down your mids, but even on the Hiwatts Gilmour has his mids at 40%, bass at 50% and treble up towards 60%. If you have a delay pedal, that would help get you ...


3

The U2 ICE2A165 chip should be replaced by an ICE2A265 (just as cheap). It's a standard 8-pin IC; if I was working on that board, I'd pull the broken chip, insert an 8-pin IC socket and then use the upgraded chip (it has better thermal properties). Talk to another repair man - this doesn't seem like a challenging or expensive fix.


3

My thoughts on whether or not to buy another amp or effects pedal: if it were me, I'd go down to the music shop and try out a few effect pedals and while I was there I'd play through a few different amps to see the differences in sound. At that point I might decide to buy a pedal or I might choose an amp. A third possibility might be that I'd choose to wait ...


3

A few answers: I'd definitely suggest that yes, go ahead and learn a few solos you like. It'll give you many satisfactions and you'll learn a lot of useful things. If your strings break that often, it may be that you play a little too hard, or there may be some sharp edges on the bridge saddle, the nut, or even on some frets. This is common on cheap ...


3

I think what you are looking for is an amp attenuator or what I think the other answer referred to as a "power soak" It will allow you to crank up the volume on the amp to drive those tubes while 'soaking' up most of the loudness and not getting you evicted while still getting those sweet tube tonez. I know UA came out with a rather pricy 'the ox'. Was ...


3

One option is to hook a "power soak" up to the output of your amp. Marshall used to make one, but I haven't heard of anyone using them in years. A friend of mine used one on stage for years and was very pleased with the way it worked. I suppose you might be able to find out about them by googling. I hope this helps.


3

This is generally expected behaviour, but that does depend on your amp. Some amps are designed to give you more clean headroom, but you don't have much headroom in a small amp. The answer is to not crank the volume up as high. If you need more volume, get a higher wattage amp.


3

Doing so, you will not be able to enjoy the "full power" of your amp: because of the impedance mismatch, part of these 5W will no be transferred to the cabs. In the end you will get lower sound level that with using matched cabs (8 ohms) but this should not damage anything. In the end, the amp will deliver less current than what it is made for…


3

This kind of setup is OK for practicing at home. But IMO it's a pain to move around from place to place and it's probably about 3 too many points of failure for playing a gig and probably is not going to be anywhere near loud enough for that (or band practice). A cheap, powered PA speaker will probably get you there, volume-wise, but the reliability and ...


3

A solid-state amp has some decent features that are worth considering when buying an amp. For high-gain sounds I have found that solid-state makes the controlling of the gain more precise, a solid-state amp just responds to gain in a more predictable manner. For a long time it was rather hard to get truly hard to get high-gain sounds out of tubes. I don't ...


3

Although there is nothing "magical" about vacuum tubes that couldn't be emulated with a transistor-based circuit in a power amp, most transistor-based amps are designed to behave as thought they have a source impedance that is very near zero ohms. Thus will cause them to put half as much power into an 8 ohm load as they would put into a four ohm ...


3

A 2A adaptor should be capable of driving that - there's probably no more than just over 1A with everything plugged in. There are plenty of adaptors that will supply more than the rated 2A you tried with, Maybe the original is old, cheap, and obviously not up to the job. A 5A will make you futureproof - always a good thing. The gear will only pull what it ...


2

For a very small footprint, 2 amp system you could use a couple of iPhones, or tablets, or androids, old, new... whatever. Buy 2 guitar interfaces like Peavey Ampkit. iRig, etc.... Very inexpensive. Download the apps for the said devices, AmpKit, Amplitube, Tonebridge... Tons of options here. (many are free). Run both the signals to a mini-mixer from the ...


2

You can consider the following amps. All around a 100$. Fender Champion 20 A good amount of amp models, mostly fender amps sims, but a few Vox models for good measure. Really decent amount of in-built effects. The effects are basic but good enough for a player who is just getting his/her feet wet. Blackstar LT-ECHO 10w Practice Amp what is nice is this ...


2

I discovered that my Yamaha Silent Cello also has a line out. Plugging the transmitter into that (and not the headphone jack as I was doing) solved the issue. Probably different physical properties (impedance etc) for each output.


2

Case closed. I contacted a local asbestos abatement company and the manager says asbestos was at one time used as fire retardant in some electronics. Anyway, said company is disposing of it. Thanks all.


2

There is only one channel available on the powered speaker. So doing anything 'stereo' is a waste. You have L/mono out of the drum brain. That sums it all together. Use that, and plug into one channel of the Behringer. One signal in, one signal out. Simple, and using the simplest plug arrangement - mono to mono. To make it sound really good, get another ...


2

If you want the real simple solution; record into your phone, but put the phone further away from yourself so it isn't biased on where it's pointing. More complex: Use the condenser mic you have, and hook it to your computer. Record the sound there. Also record the sound (and video) on your phone. Transfer that file to the computer. Use music software to ...


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