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2

I discovered that my Yamaha Silent Cello also has a line out. Plugging the transmitter into that (and not the headphone jack as I was doing) solved the issue. Probably different physical properties (impedance etc) for each output.


8

You've correctly analysed why the cable impedance does not matter in the way it does for HF transmission lines. (Though, the assumption of vacuum light speed is actually not completely valid – the dielectric factors into this, but it doesn't change the fact that the wavelengths are many times longer than any guitar cable.) That notwithstanding though, the ...


0

I spent some time a few years ago as a Fender warranty repair technician. Occasionally, I would get an amp on my bench that acted as you describe. Almost invariably the amp had taken a blow of some sort and caused the pots to break at the point just above where they were soldered onto the circuit board. This effectively disconnects them from the circuit and ...


1

This amp has 2 separate channels you can switch between with the channel select button in the middle. Only the set of controls for the selected channel will have an effect on the sound. Maybe you inadvertently switched to the left channel so the gain control and everything on the right side is disabled...


1

Are you running the receiver on battery or plugged in? I recommend the battery, to avoid pickup from the mains. Next, look carefully at the output impedance and voltage of your cello (I am not sure all Yamaha Silent models are the same, or I'd tell you what I see on mine) and compare with the input impedance of the Boss transmitter, as well as its maximum ...


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