23

It's great that you're thinking about where your line breaks should go, and putting them at natural "punctuation" points is generally a good idea. Breaking mid-measure though is pushing this too far. While it may fit the phrase better, it's a bit disrupting to read. Experienced musicians are very good at identifying phrases, especially when they're 4 or 8 ...


11

What you're doing is doubling up on the phrase marking, which is there just for the purpose you propose. Is there any extra point in breaking up bars? Not for me. It seems an amateur thing to do, as the phrasing marks already do the job. Even without phrasing marks, most musos would be able to translate how the line of music should scan, and for me, looking ...


10

The lower version is right, definitely. You write the pickup measure with the actual note durations, not like "read all staves and try to figure out if this is a pickup bar or not". Think about if those weren't a grand staff i.e. tied treble and bass staves, but a score with two separate instruments. Would it be OK to write a whole-bar rest for the second ...


8

It doesn't matter how you end the piece. Centuries ago there was a convention that you compensated for the pickup measure at the end. But nowadays nobody is going to complain. I see pieces all the time notated with a pickup and a complete bar at the end. Update: This is not a general rule. If a piece is written in such a way that repeating from the end to ...


7

Actual note duration for the rest. What should happen at the other end of the piece is a part bar containing the two 'missing' beats - often as rests - but increasingly forgotten, sadly. So if there is the remains of the bar at the end, it's best to use a two beat rest there, making a full bar rest at the beginning rather pointless. Having said that, I don'...


7

There is a convention that scores for music theater (particularly on Broadway) are always written with four bars per line. Of course that only makes sense because the music is rhythmically boring with nothing but four-bar phrases! It does boost the wages of music copyists whose union rates are per page, not per note. More empty space on the page means more ...


7

I would consider breaking measures like this, but only when: the music starts with an anacrusis (say one quarter note for the sake of this example) and there's a repeated section which requires you to go back to the beginning and repeat the anacrusis. In these circumstances you have to put the end-repeat :| bar line one quarter note before the end of an ...


5

It's called an "anacrusis" or pickup measure. 1/ Easiest way is to add one when you start a new score, just tick the checkbox and add the value: 2/ Another way, e.g. if you already have created a score without a pickup measure, is to modify the first measure, by right clicking on it, then selecting "measure properties". There you can ...


4

Is this a good practice; is it breaking any engraving guidelines or rules? Oh, yes, this would be a good practice. It helps to understand the musical structure and would support to learn a piece by heart. Would musicians reading such a score, prefer this technique; or does it impair readability/functionality? This may be opinion based and individual. ...


4

Probably the acid test is to play it with a repeat - which I appreciate may well not be there. But by doing this, you'll feel that the rhythm of it all will fit better one way or the other. I suspect the second version is what you'll end up with. Looking at the complete work would give more clues, though.


4

It's a bit unconventional, but it can work. About three years ago someone brought to my viola da gamba trio an In Nomine by John Bull. It was handwritten and had loads of linebreaks in the middle of bars, or three-quarters of the way through a bar, or wherever it wanted to have a linebreak. To start with we thought this was very strange and we really ...


3

Your text notation is correct: the anacrusis is a weak beat, and the metric accent should fall on beat 1 of each measure. To help you feel the music in that way, first try practicing only the downbeat of each measure. There is a built-in "melody" that you can learn to hear. Once you're clear on what those "main" notes are, try practicing ...


3

One must also note that the piece is a gavotte. The anacrusis is part of the dance step. The music of a gavotte is in 4/4 which musically has a strong beat on the 1 of the 4-beat measure. On the other hand (or foot), the dance step starts on beat 3; thus the music is written with a 2-beat anacrusis. (Starting on a beat other than the first is common in ...


2

As you probably know already, anacrusis relates closely to the concept of weak/strong beats. And the perception of weak and strong beats is actually independent of the volume of the sound. To demonstrate this, use an electric metronome or a metronome app (that beeps on each downbeat, that's the point of this) and set it to around 80-130 (the tempo that you ...


2

I've found one workaround, but I'm not sure I really like it since the sum of the \partial durations is longer than the actual pickup measure: \version "2.16.0" \relative c'' { \key g \major \partial 4 g16 \partial 4 g fis d b | e2 } and Lilypond warns about this: trying to use \partial after the start of a piece \partial 4 g16 ...


2

This is common practice in strophic songs and hymns. But it's invariably notated with a double barline at the line break, not just an open end.


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