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-1

I'd actually take a completely different take than the other answers here. The sequence Cm7 | Em7b5 | BbMaj7 | G7 Is likely a root of Eb progression. Cm7 is VI, BbMaj7 is V (though Maj7 chords are frequently IV) and Em7b5 is likely a tritone substitution for BbMaj7. A more clear example is the a II V I in the key of Eb, with Cm7 serving as a substitute of ...


3

Even in tonal music every chord does not need to have a functional role. Beside the possibility of mixing tonal and non-functional harmony, the obvious case would be a passing chord. | Cm7 | Em7b5 | Bbmaj7 | G7 | In that progression Cm7 and Bbmaj7 combine to give all tones for Bb major, the G7 could also be a clear secondary dominant to the Cm7. Without ...


1

| Cm7 | Em7b5 | Bbmaj7 | G7 | The Em7b5 works as a secondary dominant in the sense that it makes you expect an F something chord, the E note sounds like a leading tone heading to F. But instead of an F based chord, the progression gives you a Bb chord. So a secondary dominant function doesn't really get fulfilled, the desire and wanting is interrupted. But ...


0

Em7♭5 is a re-voicing of Gm6. Gm is the relative minor of B♭ major. So another slant on the sequence could be ii7 > vi6 > I▵ > V/ii. Does the pattern loop at that point, or does it develop further? Right now, more information would elicit a clearer answer.


2

I have to admit that it's easier for me to think of the Em7♭5 as a voice leading construct, as Cm7 - Em7♭5 only requires shifting the Cm7's C and E♭ one step each and leaving its G and B♭ as is, and Em7♭5 - B♭maj7 only requires shifting the Em7♭5's E and G one whole step each and leaving its B♭ and D as is. With that being said, there are at least two ways ...


1

The Em7b5 here is functioning as a substitute for C9 — that is, it's as though the music shifted from C minor to C major. The C is established as the tonic by the first chord, so the ear will retain it and hear the E chord in that context. Thus in functional harmony terms, the progression would be i | I | VII | V . (Cm9) (C9) Cm7 Eb7b5 (D) D Bb Bb G ...


0

My take is that the intro clearly is in Db major with the melody notes (other than the passing D and E chromatic) all in the Db major scale. I agree the key change occurs in bar seven when the Em leads to the dominant A7 setting us firmly into the D-major key, clearly the home key of the song. This is definitely one of the most innovative tunes and harmonic &...


0

First two bars are built from Bb7b13 scale, fifth mode of harmonic minor. Next bar is an A diminished scale sound. Then a simple Eb/Bb chord. Next three bars are a minor ii-V-I progression, where the ii chord is a c half diminished with the b5 in bass (fairly common jazz voicing) and the F is an F13 chord.


5

Chevron above Arabic number marks pitch of the notes with respect to the root of the key. In this case these notes are 6 and 5 in scale of the key. There is one flat in key signature, so the key could be F major or D minor. In this case it must be F major, as D is 6 in F (it is interval of major sixth above F), and C is 5 in F.


0

Neglecting repeats, the form of Mozart's Rondo Alla Turca is actually more like this: A-B-C-B-A-B'-Coda Note the A sections are in A minor overall, the B sections and the coda are in A major, and the C section is in F sharp minor overall. Both the A and C sections are themselves in rounded binary form. Thus, we can expand the notated form of Mozart's Rondo ...


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