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1

The Answer; or, TL;DR The Whole-Tone Scale is the structural glue that holds together the Simpsons's Theme. The Main Theme is fundamentally in Major, but avoids scale degree 4 in favor of #4, which serves as a chromatic lower neighbor to 5 and lends cohesiveness to the whole-tone glue. A true Lydian piece would avoid 5-1 relationships, which detract from ...


1

C to E♭ is a minor 3rd regardless of context. Whether it's 1- ♭3 in C major or 1 - , well, WHAT shall we call it in C minor? '3'? '♭3'? I suggest '♭3' is the only useful choicde. And the same for chord labels. Outside a textbook exercise, music DOESN'T stick neatly in one mode. It might not even stick to one tonic for long! But if we do establish C ...


4

There are differing conventions. I learned to use lower-case vi for the 6-chord in major and upper-case VI for the 6-chord in minor. The argument for including the flat-sign is to make clear the interval above the tonic. So it depends on whether you're using the Roman numeral to indicate scale degree or interval. The convention I was taught included using ...


2

It is a fact more obvious than the daily sunrise that irony is Donald Fagen's stock in trade. We can look no further than the devastatingly arch Chain Lightning for positive proof. Fagen's narrators are always unreliable. The presence of the word ultimate suggests that the use of five chords, while impressive to the narrator, is nothing to write home about. ...


0

The excerpt shown is composed and performed in a consistent 3+2 meter. In the score Bar 2 Although the tenor and bass sing stressed syllables on beat 3, there are other elements working against this being a point of emphasis within the measure. The presence of a descending line tends to draw emphasis away, particularly when set against an ascending line, ...


1

Pinpointing a specific emotion in music is a fraught endeavor. Maybe it's "sad"... or maybe it's "ennui"... or a hundred other shades of grey on a spectrum of emotions. I think it's simple enough to say generically it's emotional. It is expressive. Both in the vocal part and the guitar part. It's also in a slow tempo. Slow tempo and ...


-2

'Keys' are a very basic concept, suitable for getting your bearings and knowing which notes you should be sharpening/flattening. But to say that a song is in a particular 'key' is often quite a simplified description of its tonality, and not necessarily a good guide to how something is going to 'feel'. If you are familiar with classical music, you may see a ...


2

I would rather analyse the progression in G♯-minor, not B-major. Then it's ⅰ5 - Ⅵ | Ⅶsus9-Ⅶsus4 - ⅴ-Ⅴ/7add4 This is quite similar to ⅰ - Ⅵ | Ⅶ - Ⅴ7 which I'd consider a bit of a film-music-cliché progression. Omitting the minor tonic's third is common for getting a minor key's dramatic properties without bringing in the melancholy ones. The Ⅶ, which ...


1

All music,and the 'classical' style in particular, is based on elements of repetition and of variation. It's not really true than changing one note will bring the whole edifice tumbling down! But I sort of see what you're getting at. If writing a fugue, for instance, where each voice states the theme in turn, it would be odd to capriciously vary one of the ...


2

The last chord can certainly be heard as a type of chord IV leading to Gm: as you say, Cm6/G The first two chords are not functional in the Roman numeral sense but there’s plenty to say about them as regards voice leading if you want to write similar sequences. Firstly the bass descends by semitone a-ab-g. There are also tritone pairs that descend in major ...


1

There is very little point in trying to analyse this sort of thing as functional harmony. Or even in trying to pin labels onto the individual chords. Just let it be what it is, described by the notation. We're not in 'chord sequence' territory here. The brief, accurate way to describe these chords is the notation.


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