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1

Alan W. Pollack has an excellent article on this song here: http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/DATABASES/AWP/iif.shtml He analyzes the intro in detail. I agree with his take on it personally. The first 6 bars are in Db and the D chord in the 6th bar is the pivot chord that serves as both the bII in Db and the I in D. in a nutshell: in Db: ii bII I ...


4

It’s not a great idea to just shift to enharmonic names for chords, because that can obscure their function within the key. Beethoven tends to be quite careful about his enharmonic spelling. The D♭ minor chord is a iv chord, and that immediately changes into the even stronger pre-dominant function chord called a Neapolitan 6th. A Neapolitan 6th chord is ...


3

Common tones. That's the standard word for a note that is common to two (or more) harmonies and is usually held/sustained/repeated when moving between two (or more) harmonies. In most usage, it's a term that's reserved for voice-leading strategies (e.g., "hold on to the common tone between the chord and move the other notes in reverse direction to the bass"...


0

To start with, that quadruplet notation is ugly. I'm pretty sure it would be much better to write this rhythm by taking the three quarter notes and dividing them into four dotted eighth notes (tied and beamed appropriately). Tuplets could make sense, but only if the intended effect is to take the listener on a departure from the prevailing meter, which doesn'...


0

bVII can be considered as a substitution of V7. e.g. we expect V7 in a semi clause of a phrase and bVII substitutes V7 (d,f are shared tones of both chords). see my answer - and many good other answers here: Why do many songs in major keys use a bVII chord?


3

I think it works there because it is the end of the circle of 5ths (not necessarily all dominant, but the root movement anyway starting with the Bm7) , but the F chord (FAC), especially with the melody notes A and E are substituting for ii there in a ii V I progression going back to G. The F note acts as sort of a suspension resolving to the E. One has to be ...


7

The 'middle 8', as in so many songs, is a jump to a slightly remote chord then a 'cycle of 5ths' sequence back to the tonic. But this time it hits the tonic and keeps on going! Bm7, Em7, Am7, D7, Gmaj7 (we're home) Cmaj7, F - then a side-slip back to the dominant (D7) and home (G). Nice, isn't it! I could come up with some theory about bVII being a ...


1

Jean-Philippe Rameau ( 1683-1764 ) in France , may have originated the use of Roman Numerals in the early 1720's when he published his "Treatise on Harmony" which was published in 1722.


1

The term you are looking for might be „bwv 1001 fugue analysis“ and will give you answers by google like: https://repository.asu.edu/attachments/110400/content/Felice_asu_0010E_12782.pdf A Pedagogical and Performance Edition of J. S. Bach’s Violin Sonata I in G minor, BWV 1001, Transcribed for Guitar: Transcription, Analysis, Performance Guide, Pedagogical ...


0

Your title is "Bach fugues" then your post says "THE fugue." It's not clear if you want only analysis of BWV 1001... Siglind Bruhn, J. S. Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier: In-depth Analysis and Interpretation https://www.amazon.com/Bachs-Well-Tempered-Clavier-Depth-Interpretation/dp/9625800174/ Online in a few places... http://edition-gorz.de/bruhn4-engl....


1

In the Royal Conservatory study of Theory - Level 9 and 10 Harmony and the ARCT level of Harmony in their textbooks they go into the Analysis of many of Bach's Fugues.


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