The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

New answers tagged

2

If this should be a coda some how you could interpret each final group as a coda: repeating the same chords V-I, the same motif - only in different octaves like your example). But what does it matter ... except as a help to the members of an ensemble as orientation from where to start in a practice hour? Surely not to the audience! So this question seems ...


5

Codas are separate-sounding ends of pieces. They are generally found in more sectional pieces like sonata-allegros, ternary-form pieces, rondos, and even theme and variations. They are generally split off from the rest of the piece by a perfect (a.k.a. authentic) cadence. They also do not tend to precisely mirror any earlier sections (unlike the rest of the ...


6

Coda means tail, ending. Most pieces will (obviously) have an ending, and it's usually the point where the music comes down to its final resting place - using a cadence that indicates this. Here, there's a perfect cadence (V>I) so it feels like it's the ending. A coda is often a separate part of a piece, several bars long, that gets played after repeats ...


1

In classical theory, an "altered chord" usually refers to a chord that contains non-diatonic notes, which are chromatically raised or lowered by a semitone from the usual notes of the scale. This encompasses a wide variety of possible chords, and many would even speak of altering the root of a chord, if it is a non-diatonic note within the local key/scale. ...


2

yes it happens. I once "wrote" the theme from Rocky as a 3/4 ballad. It was a long time before I found out ...


1

not all alterations make a chord an "altered" chord ... So which alterations don't make an altered chord? The German Wiki-page is different from the English version: It says altering the prime will be a different chord as the chord is named by the root note: e.g. Bb in C is a borrowed chord. Altering the 3rd will change the mode from major to minor and ...


2

In Jazz usage "altered" refers to chords where the 5th or 9th (or both) are raised or lowered. Often a chord will have both raised and lowered notes simultaneously. There are various ways to notate the alterations: either with +/- or #/♭ Examples: C7+5 C7#5 C7♭5 C7+5+9 The notation C(alt) refers to a chord with both raised and lowered 5th and 9th. A ...


2

The term 'altered chord' is sometimes used to label an extended dominant 7th shape where only the 3rd and 7th remain unaltered. The 5th is both raised and lowered, likewise the 9th and 11th.


0

I can imagine a tenor derived from e.g. an early invocation that doesn‘t fit to a note-to-note c.p. But such practices are historical nonsense: trying to apply the rules of Fux to music that was not „written“ for polyphony. Because: First step to train the rules of Fux would be to compose a good c,f. The aim of studying c.p. must be to overcome the ...


0

Given a cantus firmus, is it always possible to do counterpoint with it? By the time we get to Handel, he says yes, even if his countersubjects are often mostly rests. We'd have to move this question to mathoverflow to find someone dogged enough to find a counterexample, a c.f. so pathological that counterpoint would be impossible. You may have to qualify ...


2

I think this question can only be answered if you know not only the constraints on species counterpoint (as the OP clarified to Westergaard's formulation), but also the constraints on what constitutes a "proper" cantus firmus. Westergaard (I'm assuming we're talking about his tonal theory book) is working with a set of rules of species counterpoint that are ...


1

Augmented triad is symmetric, so it pulls towards C the same much as it does towards Ab or E. I would agree with your interpretation that it is a secondary dominant (Eb+) to the following IV chord (Ab).


3

Bar ten's first half is I6. Its second half is also I6, but with the B natural acting as a passing tone from Bb to C, or as something like an inverted appoggiatura or cambiata if you consider the melody to be Eb - Bnat - C. There's no need to invoke obscure harmony; melody explains it enough.


4

Writing a new piece in the language of common practice is almost impossible without using motives or melodic/rhythmic patterns that others have already invented. Like a child can't learn to speak without using the words it has learnt by it's environment - also we are not able to express ourselves musically without using the musical elements we have adapted ...


7

Yes, this is a common phenomenon. I think this happens to everyone who writes music, regardless of style. If you're writing in Common Practice style specifically, then I think you'll find it very hard to come up with a theme that doesn't sound like you're ripping off some other composer. That's because Common Practice rules are very restrictive and ...


2

There is some mathematical analysis about the subject. There were a few cantus fermi that could be proved not to have a satisfactory counterpoint. Generally, most melodies do admit of some type of counterpoint.


Top 50 recent answers are included